Improving Adherence to Cardiovascular Therapies: An Economic Evaluation of a Randomized Pragmatic Trial

David H. Smith, Maureen O'Keeffe-Rosetti, Ashli A. Owen-Smith, Cynthia Rand, Jeffrey Tom, Suma Vupputuri, Reesa Laws, Amy Waterbury, Dana D. Hankerson-Dyson, Cyndee Yonehara, Andrew Williams, Jennifer Schneider, John F. Dickerson, William M. Vollmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective Preplanned economic analysis of a pragmatic trial using electronic-medical-record-linked interactive voice recognition (IVR) reminders for enhancing adherence to cardiovascular medications (i.e., statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors [ACEIs], and angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs]). Methods Three groups, usual care (UC), IVR, and IVR plus educational materials (IVR+), with 21,752 suboptimally adherent patients underwent follow-up for 9.6 months on average. Costs to implement and deliver the intervention (from a payer perspective) were tracked during the trial. Medical care costs and outcomes were ascertained using electronic medical records. Results Per-patient intervention costs ranged from $9 to $17 for IVR and from $36 to $47 for IVR+. For ACEI/ARB, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for each percent adherence increase was about 3 times higher with IVR+ than with IVR ($6 and $16 for IVR and IVR+, respectively). For statins, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for each percent adherence increase was about 7 times higher with IVR+ than with IVR ($6 and $43 for IVR and IVR+, respectively). Considering potential cost offsets from reduced cardiovascular events, the probability of breakeven was the highest for UC, but the IVR-based interventions had a higher probability of breakeven for subgroups with a baseline low-density lipoprotein (LDL) level of more than 100 mg/dl and those with two or more calls. Conclusions We found that the use of an automated voice messaging system to promote adherence to ACEIs/ARBs and statins may be cost-effective, depending on a decision maker's willingness to pay for unit increase in adherence. When considering changes in LDL level and downstream medical care offsets, UC is the optimal strategy for the general population. However, IVR-based interventions may be the optimal choice for those with elevated LDL values at baseline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-184
Number of pages9
JournalValue in Health
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Keywords

  • adherence
  • cardiovascular
  • diabetes
  • economics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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