Improvements in Body Satisfaction Among Obese Preadolescent African American Girls After Participation in a Weight-Loss Intervention

Danielle Lorch Vincent, Anna Newton, Lynae J. Hanks, Kevin Fontaine, Krista Casazza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. To evaluate the relationship between body dissatisfaction, self-esteem, self-efficacy, and changes in body mass index (BMI) and body fat in 40 obese African American (AA) preadolescent females, aged 7 to 12 years, participating in a weight-loss intervention. Methods. The 18-week intervention consisted of 2 phases: a 6-week eucaloric phase and a 12-week hypocaloric phase, in which all food was provided. The Contour Drawing Rating Scale adapted for use in AA populations assessed body dissatisfaction. Self-efficacy was assessed by the Weight Efficacy Life-Style Questionnaire and self-esteem by Rosenberg’s Self-Esteem Scale. Total body fat and trunk fat were assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Results. Findings indicated that body dissatisfaction was positively associated with trunk fat at 6 weeks and BMI at the end of the intervention, and a higher BMI was associated with a larger perceived body figure, though these associations varied over the course of the study. Conclusions and Implications. Participation in a weight-loss intervention, which results in actual and perceived reductions in BMI and trunk fat, offers a capacity to improve the psychological status and well-being of obese preadolescent AA females.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)148-153
Number of pages6
JournalInfant, Child, and Adolescent Nutrition
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 6 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

African Americans
self-esteem
body mass index
Weight Loss
Body Mass Index
weight loss
Self Concept
self-efficacy
Fats
Self Efficacy
body fat
Adipose Tissue
lipids
rating scales
lifestyle
Life Style
X-radiation
questionnaires
X-Rays
Psychology

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • body fat distribution
  • body image
  • body mass index
  • weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Improvements in Body Satisfaction Among Obese Preadolescent African American Girls After Participation in a Weight-Loss Intervention. / Vincent, Danielle Lorch; Newton, Anna; Hanks, Lynae J.; Fontaine, Kevin; Casazza, Krista.

In: Infant, Child, and Adolescent Nutrition, Vol. 7, No. 3, 06.06.2015, p. 148-153.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vincent, Danielle Lorch ; Newton, Anna ; Hanks, Lynae J. ; Fontaine, Kevin ; Casazza, Krista. / Improvements in Body Satisfaction Among Obese Preadolescent African American Girls After Participation in a Weight-Loss Intervention. In: Infant, Child, and Adolescent Nutrition. 2015 ; Vol. 7, No. 3. pp. 148-153.
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