Improvements in an Organization's Culture of Health Reduces Workers' Health Risk Profile and Health Care Utilization

Rachel Mosher Henke, Michael A. Head, Karen B. Kent, Ron Z. Goetzel, Enid Chung Roemer, Katherine McCleary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine changes in internal and external cultures of health scores and relate those changes to employees' health risks, health care utilization, and costs for 21 large employers (N = 641,901). METHODS: We measured the relationship between changes in internal and external culture of health scores and changes in employee health risks, health care utilization, and costs. RESULTS: Improvements in a company's internal culture of health predicted lower levels of obesity, poor diet, and tobacco use but higher stress for employees reporting high baseline risk. For those not at high baseline risk, health improved for depression, alcohol consumption, and diet. Improvements in internal culture of health also led to lower prescription drug utilization. CONCLUSION: Investments in internal culture of health predict improvements in some employee health risks and health care utilization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)96-101
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume61
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

Fingerprint

Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Organizations
Health
Occupational Health
Health Care Costs
Diet
Drug Utilization
Prescription Drugs
Tobacco Use
Alcohol Drinking
Obesity
Depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Improvements in an Organization's Culture of Health Reduces Workers' Health Risk Profile and Health Care Utilization. / Henke, Rachel Mosher; Head, Michael A.; Kent, Karen B.; Goetzel, Ron Z.; Roemer, Enid Chung; McCleary, Katherine.

In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 61, No. 2, 01.02.2019, p. 96-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d0718524bd974fdd9ade38f4c2594ac4,
title = "Improvements in an Organization's Culture of Health Reduces Workers' Health Risk Profile and Health Care Utilization",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To examine changes in internal and external cultures of health scores and relate those changes to employees' health risks, health care utilization, and costs for 21 large employers (N = 641,901). METHODS: We measured the relationship between changes in internal and external culture of health scores and changes in employee health risks, health care utilization, and costs. RESULTS: Improvements in a company's internal culture of health predicted lower levels of obesity, poor diet, and tobacco use but higher stress for employees reporting high baseline risk. For those not at high baseline risk, health improved for depression, alcohol consumption, and diet. Improvements in internal culture of health also led to lower prescription drug utilization. CONCLUSION: Investments in internal culture of health predict improvements in some employee health risks and health care utilization.",
author = "Henke, {Rachel Mosher} and Head, {Michael A.} and Kent, {Karen B.} and Goetzel, {Ron Z.} and Roemer, {Enid Chung} and Katherine McCleary",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/JOM.0000000000001479",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "61",
pages = "96--101",
journal = "Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine",
issn = "1076-2752",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Improvements in an Organization's Culture of Health Reduces Workers' Health Risk Profile and Health Care Utilization

AU - Henke, Rachel Mosher

AU - Head, Michael A.

AU - Kent, Karen B.

AU - Goetzel, Ron Z.

AU - Roemer, Enid Chung

AU - McCleary, Katherine

PY - 2019/2/1

Y1 - 2019/2/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine changes in internal and external cultures of health scores and relate those changes to employees' health risks, health care utilization, and costs for 21 large employers (N = 641,901). METHODS: We measured the relationship between changes in internal and external culture of health scores and changes in employee health risks, health care utilization, and costs. RESULTS: Improvements in a company's internal culture of health predicted lower levels of obesity, poor diet, and tobacco use but higher stress for employees reporting high baseline risk. For those not at high baseline risk, health improved for depression, alcohol consumption, and diet. Improvements in internal culture of health also led to lower prescription drug utilization. CONCLUSION: Investments in internal culture of health predict improvements in some employee health risks and health care utilization.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To examine changes in internal and external cultures of health scores and relate those changes to employees' health risks, health care utilization, and costs for 21 large employers (N = 641,901). METHODS: We measured the relationship between changes in internal and external culture of health scores and changes in employee health risks, health care utilization, and costs. RESULTS: Improvements in a company's internal culture of health predicted lower levels of obesity, poor diet, and tobacco use but higher stress for employees reporting high baseline risk. For those not at high baseline risk, health improved for depression, alcohol consumption, and diet. Improvements in internal culture of health also led to lower prescription drug utilization. CONCLUSION: Investments in internal culture of health predict improvements in some employee health risks and health care utilization.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85061099390&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85061099390&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001479

DO - 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001479

M3 - Article

C2 - 30358659

AN - SCOPUS:85061099390

VL - 61

SP - 96

EP - 101

JO - Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

JF - Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

SN - 1076-2752

IS - 2

ER -