Improvement in body image, perceived health, and health-related self-efficacy among people with serious mental illness: The stride study

Bobbi Jo H. Yarborough, Michael C. Leo, Micah T. Yarborough, Scott Stumbo, Shannon L. Janoff, Nancy A. Perrin, Carla A. Green

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: The authors examined secondary outcomes of STRIDE, a randomized controlled trial that tested a weightloss and lifestyle intervention for individuals taking antipsychotic medications. Methods: Hierarchical linear regression was used to explore the effects of the intervention and weight change at followup (six, 12, and 24 months) on body image, perceived health, and health-related self-efficacy. Results: Participants were 200 adults who were overweight and taking antipsychotic agents. Weight change3study arm interaction was associated with significant improvement in body image from baseline to six months. From baseline to 12 months, body image scores of intervention participants improved by 1.7 pointsmore comparedwith scores of control participants; greater weight loss was associated with more improvement. Between baseline and 24 months, greater weight losswas associatedwith improvements in body image, perceived health, and health-related self-efficacy. Conclusions: Participation in STRIDE improved body image, and losing weight improved perceived health and healthrelated self-efficacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)296-301
Number of pages6
JournalPsychiatric Services
Volume67
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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