Implementing the National Academy's vision and strategy for toxicity testing: Opportunities and challenges under the U.S. toxic substances control act

Paul A. Locke, D. Bruce Myers

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

In 2007, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council (NRC), issued the report Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and a Strategy. This report, which was commissioned by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), called for the U.S. EPA to develop a new approach for how this agency evaluates the toxicity of compounds. The report recommended that the agency move from its current testing system, which is based largely on traditional toxicology, to a testing system that is based primarily on human cell lines and in vitro systems. Successful implementation of the report's vision and strategy will require that scientists, lawyers, and policymakers work together to bridge the gap among disciplines. An important step in building this bridge requires an analysis of the U.S. legal system that frames toxicity testing. If the U.S. laws, regulations, and policies erect barriers that would prevent or impede the U.S. EPA adoption of the NRC vision and strategy, it is important to identify these challenges. At the same time, if existing laws, regulations, and policies are fertile ground for these recommendations, opportunities should be documented. This article discusses and evaluates the challenges and opportunities that arise under key provisions of one major U.S. toxics law, the Toxics Substances Control Act (TSCA).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)376-384
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Toxicology and Environmental Health - Part B: Critical Reviews
Volume13
Issue number2-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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