Implementing CBT for traumatized children and adolescents after september 11: Lessons learned from the child and adolescent trauma treatments and services (CATS) project

Kimberly Eaton Hoagwood, Chip Felton, Sheila Donahue, Anita Appel, James Rodriguez, Laura Murray, Jessica Mass Levitt, David Fernandez, Joanna Legerski, Michelle Chung, Jacob Gisis, Jennifer Sawaya, Marleen Radigan, Sudha Mehta, Jameson Foster, Maura Crowe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Child and Adolescent Trauma Treatments and Services Consortium (CATS) was the largest youth trauma project associated with the September 11 World Trade Center disaster. CATS was created as a collaborative project involving New York State policymakers; academic scientists; clinical treatment developers; and routine practicing clinicians, supervisors, and administrators. The CATS project was established to deliver evidence-based cognitive-behavioral trauma treatments for children and adolescents affected by the September 11 terrorist attack in New York City and to examine implementation processes and outcomes associated with delivery of these treatments. Referrals were obtained on 1,764 children and adolescents; of these, 1,387 were subsequently assessed with a standardized clinical battery and 704 found to be eligible for services. Ultimately 700 youth participated in the project. Treatments were delivered in either school or clinic settings by clinicians employed in 9 provider organizations in New York City. All participating clinicians were trained on the cognitive behavioral therapy models by the treatment developers and received case consultation for 18 months by expert clinician consultants and the treatment developers. The challenges of mounting a large trauma treatment project within routine clinical practices in the aftermath of a disaster and simultaneously evaluating the project have been significant. We outline the major challenges, describe strategies we employed to address them, and make recommendations based on critical lessons learned.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)581-592
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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