Implementation of Text-Messaging and Social Media Strategies in a Multilevel Childhood Obesity Prevention Intervention: Process Evaluation Results

Ivory H. Loh, Teresa Schwendler, Angela C.B. Trude, Elizabeth T. Anderson Steeves, Lawrence J Cheskin, Sarah Lange, Joel Gittelsohn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Social media and text messaging show promise as public health interventions, but little evaluation of implementation exists. The B'more Healthy Communities for Kids (BHCK) was a multilevel, multicomponent (wholesalers, food stores, recreation centers) childhood obesity prevention trial that included social media and text-messaging components. The BHCK was implemented in 28 low-income areas of Baltimore City, Maryland, in 2 waves. The texting intervention targeted 241 low-income African American caregivers (of 283), who received 3 texts/week reinforcing key messages, providing nutrition information, and weekly goals. Regular posting on social media platforms (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter) targeted community members and local stakeholders. High implementation standards were set a priori (57 for social media, 11 for texting), with low implementation defined as <50%, medium as 50% to 99%, high as ≥100% of the high standard for each measure. Reach, dose delivered, and fidelity were assessed via web-based analytic tools. Between waves, social media implementation improved from low-moderate to high reach, dose delivered, and fidelity. Text messaging increased from moderate to high in reach and dose delivered, fidelity decreased from high to moderate. Data were used to monitor and revise the BHCK intervention throughout implementation. Our model for evaluating text messaging-based and social media-based interventions may be applicable to other settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInquiry : a journal of medical care organization, provision and financing
Volume55
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Text Messaging
Social Media
Pediatric Obesity
Recreation
Baltimore
African Americans
Caregivers
Public Health
Food

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Baltimore
  • caregivers
  • evaluation studies
  • health promotion
  • obesity
  • process evaluation
  • social marketing
  • social media
  • text messaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Implementation of Text-Messaging and Social Media Strategies in a Multilevel Childhood Obesity Prevention Intervention : Process Evaluation Results. / Loh, Ivory H.; Schwendler, Teresa; Trude, Angela C.B.; Anderson Steeves, Elizabeth T.; Cheskin, Lawrence J; Lange, Sarah; Gittelsohn, Joel.

In: Inquiry : a journal of medical care organization, provision and financing, Vol. 55, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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