Implementation of evidence-based humanitarian programs in military-led missions: Part II. the impact assessment model

Erik J. Reaves, Kenneth W. Schor, Frederick M. Burkle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Department of Defense does not implement health-sector humanitarian assistance impact assessments to complement those of the international humanitarian aid community. This oversight fails to meet the recent Department of Defense Directive 3000.05 mandate calling for the application of measures of effectiveness. The decision by the Department of Defense to incorporate humanitarian assistance in stability operations should be supported by evidence-based impact assessments. This article proposes implementation of an impact assessment model in Department of Defense humanitarian assistance operations. The use of an impact assessment model will refocus previously identified information gaps from traditional military input-output management toward a greater emphasis on outcomes. This will help answer which humanitarian activities are successful, which are not, and why. Over time, the use of an impact assessment model will ensure that the Department of Defense and its operational units are learning as an organization while applying evidence-based lessons learned to future stability operations. Most important, the use of this model will both provide better understanding of the role that the Department of Defense has in humanitarian activities and help interpret and transfer these activities to the host nation and international aid community in a timely and efficient manner. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2008;2:237-244).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)237-244
Number of pages8
JournalDisaster medicine and public health preparedness
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Civil-military coordination
  • Disaster evaluation and monitoring
  • Humanitarian assistance
  • Measures of effectiveness
  • Military medical missions
  • Stability operations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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