Impaired lithocholate sulfation in the rhesus monkey: a possible mechanism for chenodeoxycholate toxicity

T. R. Gadacz, R. N. Allan, E. Mack, A. F. Hofmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Radioactive lithocholate was administered intravenously to female rhesus monkeys with an exteriorized enterohepatic circulation, and the chemical form of biliary radioactivity was defined by thin layer chromatography. Most radioactivity was excreted in bile in the form of unsulfated conjugates (77%), indicating impaired sulfation relative to published data for man. Defective sulfation of lithocholate, the major bacterial biotransformation product of chenodeoxycholic acid, can explain accumulation of lithocholate in the enterohepatic circulation and provide a possible mechanism for the hepatotoxicity observed during chenodeoxycholic acid administration to the nonhuman primate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1125-1129
Number of pages5
JournalGastroenterology
Volume70
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1976
Externally publishedYes

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Lithocholic Acid
Chenodeoxycholic Acid
Macaca mulatta
Enterohepatic Circulation
Radioactivity
Thin Layer Chromatography
Biotransformation
Bile
Primates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Gadacz, T. R., Allan, R. N., Mack, E., & Hofmann, A. F. (1976). Impaired lithocholate sulfation in the rhesus monkey: a possible mechanism for chenodeoxycholate toxicity. Gastroenterology, 70(6), 1125-1129.

Impaired lithocholate sulfation in the rhesus monkey : a possible mechanism for chenodeoxycholate toxicity. / Gadacz, T. R.; Allan, R. N.; Mack, E.; Hofmann, A. F.

In: Gastroenterology, Vol. 70, No. 6, 1976, p. 1125-1129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gadacz, TR, Allan, RN, Mack, E & Hofmann, AF 1976, 'Impaired lithocholate sulfation in the rhesus monkey: a possible mechanism for chenodeoxycholate toxicity', Gastroenterology, vol. 70, no. 6, pp. 1125-1129.
Gadacz, T. R. ; Allan, R. N. ; Mack, E. ; Hofmann, A. F. / Impaired lithocholate sulfation in the rhesus monkey : a possible mechanism for chenodeoxycholate toxicity. In: Gastroenterology. 1976 ; Vol. 70, No. 6. pp. 1125-1129.
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