Impact of the Ryan White CARE Act on the availability of HIV/AIDS services

Thomas G. Rundall, Jennafer Kwait, Katherine Marconi, Stephanie Bender-Kitz, David D Celentano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article assesses the extent to which the availability of HIV/AIDS services in the Baltimore and Oakland eligible metropolitan areas (EMAs) increased after receipt of funding under Title I of the Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency (CARE) Act. Survey data on the availability of HIV/AIDS services in each EMA were collected from samples of organizations at two points in time: 1 year before (1991) and 1 year after (1993) the Oakland and Baltimore EMAs received their first installments of CARE Act Title I funds. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of the data were performed to assess changes in the availability of HIV/AIDS services. The results showed that after CARE Act Title I funding became available, the availability of ambulatory medical and social support services in the Baltimore and Oakland EMAs increased. However, the way service availability increased varied significantly, reflecting differing opportunities and constraints present in each community. In Baltimore, the increase in the availability of HIV/AIDS services was due largely to the creation of new organizations that used Title I funds to provide services (system expansion). In Oakland, relatively few new organizations were created, but existing organizations added new HIV/AIDS services (service line expansion). Our data also indicated that in both EMAs the majority of HIV/AIDS organizations receiving Title I funds expanded the capacity of their existing services to meet growing demand.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)826-839
Number of pages14
JournalPolicy Studies Journal
Volume27
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

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acquired immune deficiency syndrome
human immunodeficiency virus
AIDS
act
resource
resources
metropolitan area
agglomeration area
funding
services
social support
present
demand

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration

Cite this

Rundall, T. G., Kwait, J., Marconi, K., Bender-Kitz, S., & Celentano, D. D. (1999). Impact of the Ryan White CARE Act on the availability of HIV/AIDS services. Policy Studies Journal, 27(4), 826-839.

Impact of the Ryan White CARE Act on the availability of HIV/AIDS services. / Rundall, Thomas G.; Kwait, Jennafer; Marconi, Katherine; Bender-Kitz, Stephanie; Celentano, David D.

In: Policy Studies Journal, Vol. 27, No. 4, 1999, p. 826-839.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rundall, TG, Kwait, J, Marconi, K, Bender-Kitz, S & Celentano, DD 1999, 'Impact of the Ryan White CARE Act on the availability of HIV/AIDS services', Policy Studies Journal, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 826-839.
Rundall, Thomas G. ; Kwait, Jennafer ; Marconi, Katherine ; Bender-Kitz, Stephanie ; Celentano, David D. / Impact of the Ryan White CARE Act on the availability of HIV/AIDS services. In: Policy Studies Journal. 1999 ; Vol. 27, No. 4. pp. 826-839.
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