Impact of the penalty points system on road traffic injuries in Spain: A time-series study

Ana M. Novoa, Katherine Pérez, Elena Santamarina-Rubio, Marc Marí-Dell'Olmo, Josep Ferrando, Rosana Peiró, Aurelio Tobías, Pilar Zori, Carme Borrell

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Abstract

Objectives. We assessed the effectiveness of the penalty points system (PPS) introduced in Spain in July 2006 in reducing traffic injuries. Methods. We performed an evaluation study with an interrupted time-series design. We stratified dependent variables-numbers of drivers involved in injury collisions and people injured in traffic collisions in Spain from 2000 to 2007 (police data)-by age, injury severity, type of road user, road type, and time of collision, and analyzed variables separately by gender. The explanatory variable (the PPS) compared the postintervention period (July 2006 to December 2007) with the preintervention period (January 2000 to June 2006). We used quasi- Poisson regression, controlling for time trend and seasonality. Results. Among men, we observed a significant risk reduction in the postintervention period for seriously injured drivers (relative risk [RR]=0.89) and seriously injured people (RR=0.89). The RRs among women were 0.91 (P=.095) and 0.88 (P<.05), respectively. Risk reduction was greater among male drivers, moped riders, and on urban roads. Conclusions. The PPS was associated with reduced numbers of drivers involved in injury collisions and people injured by traffic collisions in Spain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2220-2227
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume100
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Novoa, A. M., Pérez, K., Santamarina-Rubio, E., Marí-Dell'Olmo, M., Ferrando, J., Peiró, R., Tobías, A., Zori, P., & Borrell, C. (2010). Impact of the penalty points system on road traffic injuries in Spain: A time-series study. American journal of public health, 100(11), 2220-2227. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2010.192104