Impact of the Current US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendations for Cervical Cancer Screening in Young Women 21 to 29 Years Old

C. Paul Morris, Sayanan Chowsilpa, Sara Mustafa, Isaac Chan, Daniel Miller, Zahra Maleki, Erika F. Rodriguez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: In 2012, the US Preventive Services Task Force decreased the recommended frequency of cervical cytology screening to once every 3 years and recommended against testing women younger than 21 years regardless of sexual history. We evaluated the impact of this in 21 to 29-year-old women at a tertiary care academic medical center in 2011 and 2017. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed Papanicolaou test results at two time points in 21- to 29-year-old women. RESULTS: There was a decrease in the number of high-grade lesions in 21- to 25-year-old women (odds ratio [OR], 0.36) from 2011 to 2017. Within the 26- to 29-year-old patient group, there was a trend toward a higher percentage of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) in 2017 compared to 2011 on cytology, which did not reach statistical significance (OR, 1.46). However, follow-up histologic specimens showed a higher percentage of HSIL in 2017 compared to 2011 in this age group (OR, 2.16). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that the cervical cancer screening guidelines introduced in 2012 have not had a detrimental impact on the outcomes of cervical cancer screening for 21- to 25-year-old women. However, we need to continue monitoring the effects of decreased screening in 26- to 29-year-old women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)734-742
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican journal of clinical pathology
Volume153
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - May 5 2020

Keywords

  • Cervical cancer screening
  • HPV
  • HPV 16
  • HPV 18
  • High-grade intraepithelial lesion
  • Pap test
  • USPSTF

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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