Impact of surgeon subspecialty training on surgical outcomes in open globe injuries

Ian C. Han, Sidharth Puri, Jiangxia Wang, Shameema Sikder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether subspecialty training of the initial treating surgeon affects visual acuity and surgical outcomes in patients with open globe injuries. Design: This study is a single-institution, retrospective case series. Methods: The charts of adult patients with open globe injuries requiring surgical repair at the Wilmer Eye Institute between July 1, 2007 and July 1, 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical findings at presentation were recorded, and details of initial repair and follow-up surgeries were analyzed. Differences in visual acuity and surgical outcomes were compared based on subspecialty training of the initial surgeon. Results: The charts of 282 adult patients were analyzed, and 193 eyes had at least 6 months of follow-up for analysis. Eighty-six eyes (44.6%) required follow-up surgery within the first year, and 39 eyes (20.2%) were enucleated. Eyes initially treated by a vitreoretinal (VR) surgeon were 2.3 times (P=0.003) more likely to improve by one Ocular Trauma Score (OTS) visual acuity category and 1.9 times (P=0.027) more likely to have at least one more follow-up surgery at 6 months compared to eyes treated by non-VR surgeons. Patients with more anterior injuries treated by a VR surgeon were more likely to improve by one OTS visual acuity category compared to those treated by non-VR surgeons (P=0.004 and 0.016 for Zones I and II, respectively). There was no difference in visual acuity outcomes for eyes with posterior injuries (P=0.515 for Zone III). Conclusion: Eyes initially treated by a VR surgeon are more likely to improve by one OTS visual acuity category than those initially treated by a non-VR surgeon. However, patients initially treated by a VR surgeon also undergo more follow-up surgical rehabilitation, and improvement in visual acuity is more likely for anterior (Zone I and II injuries) than posterior (Zone III) injuries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1807-1813
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Ophthalmology
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Keywords

  • Afferent pupillary defect
  • Follow-up surgery
  • Ocular Trauma Score
  • Surgical repair
  • Visual acuity
  • Vitreoretinal surgeon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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