Impact of regulatory interventions to reduce intake of artificial trans-fatty acids: A systematic review

Vivien L. Hendry, Eva Almíron-Roig, Pablo Monsivais, Susan A. Jebb, Sara E.Benjamin Neelon, Simon J. Griffin, David B. Ogilvie

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

We examined the impact of regulatory action to reduce levels of artificial trans-fatty acids (TFAs) in food.

We searched Medline, Embase, ISI Web of Knowledge, and EconLit (January 1980 to December 2012) for studies related to government regulation of food-or diet-related health behaviors from which we extracted the subsample of legislative initiatives to reduce artificial TFAs in food. We screened 38 162 articles and identified 14 studies that examined artificial TFA controlslimiting permitted levels or mandating labeling. Thesemeasures achieved good compliance, with evidence of appropriate reformulation.

Regulations grounded on maximum limits and mandated labeling can lead to reductions in actual and reported TFAs in food and appear to encourage food producers to reformulate their products.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e32-e42
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume105
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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