Impact of radiocontaminants in commercially available iodine-123: Dosimetric evaluation

H. A. Ziessman, F. H. Fahey, J. M. Gochoco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Iodine-123 (123I) is considered by some to be the radionuclide of choice for thyroid scintigraphy because of its ideal physical and biological characteristics and low radiation absorbed dose to the thyroid. However, commercially available 123I (p,2n) and (p,5n) have radiocontaminants. The MIRD formalism was used to estimate the absorbed dose to the thyroid for various age groups reveiving recommended administered activities at the time of delivery and at two half-lives assuming radiocontamination levels specified by the suppliers. The calculations demonstrate that an 131I uptake with a technetium-99m scan at the time of delivery results in less absorbed dose to the thyroid than an 123I (p,2n) scan and uptake. At two half-lives the absorved dose triples and becomes equivalent to the dose from an 131I scan. The absorbed dose from an 123I (p,5n) scan at two half-lives is higher than that of an 123I (p,2n) scan at the time of delivery. Iodine-123 capsules should not be decayed down in order to obtain a recommended pediatric administered activity. There appears to be no dosimetric advantage of commercially available 123I thyroid scintigraphy for adults or most children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)428-432
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Nuclear Medicine
Volume27
Issue number3
StatePublished - Dec 1 1986
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Impact of radiocontaminants in commercially available iodine-123: Dosimetric evaluation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this