Impact of race and ethnicity on outcomes and health care utilization after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

Nandita Khera, Yu Hui Chang, James Slack, Veena Fauble, Jose F. Leis, Pierre Noel, Lisa Sproat, Jeanne Palmer, Roberta Adams, Tom Fitch, Donald Northfelt, Mignonne Guy, Jon Tilburt, Joseph Mikhael

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Abstract Disparities in outcomes after hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) are reported mostly by registry studies. We examined the association of self-reported race and ethnicity with outcomes and health care utilization after allogeneic HCT in a single center study. Clinical and socioeconomic data of 296 adult patients who underwent allogeneic HCT from November 2003 to October 2012 were analyzed. Survival was compared between non-Hispanic Whites (NHW) and minority patients using Cox proportional hazards regression. Some 73% of patients were NHW and 27% were racial/ethnic minority patients. More minority patients were younger and had lower socioeconomic status. Both unadjusted and adjusted overall and progression-free survival were comparable between the two groups. High risk disease, poor performance score and Medicare/Tricare were significant predictors of mortality. Health care utilization was comparable between the two groups. Homogeneity of medical care for allogeneic HCT may help overcome racial/ethnic disparities, but not those due to patients' primary insurance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)987-992
Number of pages6
JournalLeukemia and Lymphoma
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

Keywords

  • Disparities
  • Health care utilization
  • Hematopoietic cell transplant
  • Race/ethnicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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