Impact of more than a decade of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine use on carriage and invasive potential in native American communities

Jennifer R. Scott, Eugene V. Millar, Marc Lipsitch, Lawrence H. Moulton, Robert Weatherholtz, Mindy J. Perilla, Delois M. Jackson, Bernard Beall, Mariddie J. Craig, Raymond Reid, Mathuram Santosham, Katherine L. O'Brien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background. We assessed the impact of 12 years of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) use on pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage and serotype-specific invasive disease potential among Native Americans. Methods. Families were enrolled in a carriage study from 2006 to 2008; nasopharyngeal specimens and risk factor information were collected monthly for 7 visits. Pneumococcal carriage prevalence was compared with that before (1998-2000) and during (2001-2002) PCV7 introduction. We compared invasive disease incidence and carriage prevalence before and after PCV7 introduction to estimate changes in serotype-specific invasive potential. Results. We enrolled 1077 subjects from 302 households. There was an absolute reduction in carriage prevalence of 8.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.5%-11.4%) in children aged <5 years and 3.1% (95% CI, 1.1%-5.1%) in adults. In children aged <5 years, vaccine-serotype carriage prevalence decreased by 22.8% (95% CI, 20.1%-25.3%), and nonvaccine serotype (NVT) increased by 15.9% (95% CI, 12.4%-19.3%). No significant change was detected in serotype-specific invasive potential after PCV7 introduction. Conclusions. Pneumococcal carriage prevalence decreased in all ages since PCV7 introduction; vaccine-serotype carriage has been nearly eliminated, whereas the prevalence of NVT carriage has increased. The increase in the NVT invasive disease rate seems to be proportional to the increase in colonization prevalence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)280-288
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume205
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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