Impact of Experience Corps® Participation on Children’s Academic Achievement and School Behavior

George Rebok, Jeanine Parisi, Jeremy Barron, Michelle C Carlson, Ike Diibor, Kevin Frick, Linda P Fried, Tara L. Gruenewald, Jin Huang, Sylvia McGill, Christine M. Ramsey, William A. Romani, Teresa E. Seeman, Erwin Tan, Elizabeth K Tanner, Li Xing, Qian Li Xue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article reports on the impact of the Experience Corps® (EC) Baltimore program, an intergenerational, school-based program aimed at improving academic achievement and reducing disruptive school behavior in urban, elementary school students in Kindergarten through third grade (K-3). Teams of adult volunteers aged 60 and older were placed in public schools, serving 15 h or more per week, to perform meaningful and important roles to improve the educational outcomes of children and the health and well-being of volunteers. Findings indicate no significant impact of the EC program on standardized reading or mathematical achievement test scores among children in grades 1–3 exposed to the program. K-1st grade students in EC schools had fewer principal office referrals compared to K-1st grade students in matched control schools during their second year in the EC program; second graders in EC schools had fewer suspensions and expulsions than second graders in non-EC schools during their first year in the EC program. In general, both boys and girls appeared to benefit from the EC program in school behavior. The results suggest that a volunteer engagement program for older adults can be modestly effective for improving selective aspects of classroom behavior among elementary school students in under-resourced, urban schools, but there were no significant improvements in academic achievement. More work is needed to identify individual- and school-level factors that may help account for these results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPrevention Science
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Students
Volunteers
Baltimore
Reading
Suspensions
Referral and Consultation
Child Health
Problem Behavior

Keywords

  • Academic achievement
  • Childhood education
  • Early intervention
  • Older adult volunteers
  • School behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Impact of Experience Corps® Participation on Children’s Academic Achievement and School Behavior. / Rebok, George; Parisi, Jeanine; Barron, Jeremy; Carlson, Michelle C; Diibor, Ike; Frick, Kevin; Fried, Linda P; Gruenewald, Tara L.; Huang, Jin; McGill, Sylvia; Ramsey, Christine M.; Romani, William A.; Seeman, Teresa E.; Tan, Erwin; Tanner, Elizabeth K; Xing, Li; Xue, Qian Li.

In: Prevention Science, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rebok, George ; Parisi, Jeanine ; Barron, Jeremy ; Carlson, Michelle C ; Diibor, Ike ; Frick, Kevin ; Fried, Linda P ; Gruenewald, Tara L. ; Huang, Jin ; McGill, Sylvia ; Ramsey, Christine M. ; Romani, William A. ; Seeman, Teresa E. ; Tan, Erwin ; Tanner, Elizabeth K ; Xing, Li ; Xue, Qian Li. / Impact of Experience Corps® Participation on Children’s Academic Achievement and School Behavior. In: Prevention Science. 2019.
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