Impact of domestic violence posters on female caregivers' opinions about domestic violence screening and disclosure in a pediatric emergency department

Megan H. Bair-Merritt, Cynthia J. Mollen, Pui Ling Yau, Joel A. Fein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to examine female caregivers' attitudes about the display of domestic violence (DV) resources in a pediatric emergency department (ED) and to explore whether these resources engendered positive feelings about DV screening and encouraged disclosure. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey in a pediatric ED during 2 distinct periods, comparing responses of female caregivers before (pre) and after (post) displaying DV posters and cards. Women were surveyed about (1) personal experience with DV, (2) the appropriateness of DV posters and screening in a pediatric ED, and (3) willingness to divulge DV, if abused. RESULTS: The 2 groups (pre, n = 133; post, n = 136) did not significantly differ with respect to age, race, education, or personal DV history. The majority endorsed that "it is appropriate to have DV posters," with the post group responding in this manner more often than the pre group (pre, 85%; post, 95%; odds ratio [OR], 3.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-8.5). The post group was less likely to prefer pediatric ED DV screening (pre, 76%; post, 63%; OR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3-0.9) and tended to be less likely to say that they would divulge (pre, 85%; post, 75%; OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.3-1.1). In both groups, women with a DV history were less likely than women without this history to say that they would disclose DV to their pediatric ED provider (P <0.001). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest the need for further exploration of how to most effectively help and provide resources for abused women in this setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)689-693
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Emergency Care
Volume22
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2006

Fingerprint

Posters
Domestic Violence
Disclosure
Caregivers
Hospital Emergency Service
Pediatrics
History
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Battered Women
Emotions
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • Domestic violence
  • Resources
  • Screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Nursing(all)
  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Impact of domestic violence posters on female caregivers' opinions about domestic violence screening and disclosure in a pediatric emergency department. / Bair-Merritt, Megan H.; Mollen, Cynthia J.; Yau, Pui Ling; Fein, Joel A.

In: Pediatric Emergency Care, Vol. 22, No. 11, 11.2006, p. 689-693.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bair-Merritt, Megan H. ; Mollen, Cynthia J. ; Yau, Pui Ling ; Fein, Joel A. / Impact of domestic violence posters on female caregivers' opinions about domestic violence screening and disclosure in a pediatric emergency department. In: Pediatric Emergency Care. 2006 ; Vol. 22, No. 11. pp. 689-693.
@article{909b96883c134c25a822c6f47a979315,
title = "Impact of domestic violence posters on female caregivers' opinions about domestic violence screening and disclosure in a pediatric emergency department",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to examine female caregivers' attitudes about the display of domestic violence (DV) resources in a pediatric emergency department (ED) and to explore whether these resources engendered positive feelings about DV screening and encouraged disclosure. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey in a pediatric ED during 2 distinct periods, comparing responses of female caregivers before (pre) and after (post) displaying DV posters and cards. Women were surveyed about (1) personal experience with DV, (2) the appropriateness of DV posters and screening in a pediatric ED, and (3) willingness to divulge DV, if abused. RESULTS: The 2 groups (pre, n = 133; post, n = 136) did not significantly differ with respect to age, race, education, or personal DV history. The majority endorsed that {"}it is appropriate to have DV posters,{"} with the post group responding in this manner more often than the pre group (pre, 85{\%}; post, 95{\%}; odds ratio [OR], 3.3; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.3-8.5). The post group was less likely to prefer pediatric ED DV screening (pre, 76{\%}; post, 63{\%}; OR, 0.5; 95{\%} CI, 0.3-0.9) and tended to be less likely to say that they would divulge (pre, 85{\%}; post, 75{\%}; OR, 0.6; 95{\%} CI, 0.3-1.1). In both groups, women with a DV history were less likely than women without this history to say that they would disclose DV to their pediatric ED provider (P <0.001). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest the need for further exploration of how to most effectively help and provide resources for abused women in this setting.",
keywords = "Domestic violence, Resources, Screening",
author = "Bair-Merritt, {Megan H.} and Mollen, {Cynthia J.} and Yau, {Pui Ling} and Fein, {Joel A.}",
year = "2006",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1097/01.pec.0000238742.96606.20",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "22",
pages = "689--693",
journal = "Pediatric Emergency Care",
issn = "0749-5161",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of domestic violence posters on female caregivers' opinions about domestic violence screening and disclosure in a pediatric emergency department

AU - Bair-Merritt, Megan H.

AU - Mollen, Cynthia J.

AU - Yau, Pui Ling

AU - Fein, Joel A.

PY - 2006/11

Y1 - 2006/11

N2 - OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to examine female caregivers' attitudes about the display of domestic violence (DV) resources in a pediatric emergency department (ED) and to explore whether these resources engendered positive feelings about DV screening and encouraged disclosure. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey in a pediatric ED during 2 distinct periods, comparing responses of female caregivers before (pre) and after (post) displaying DV posters and cards. Women were surveyed about (1) personal experience with DV, (2) the appropriateness of DV posters and screening in a pediatric ED, and (3) willingness to divulge DV, if abused. RESULTS: The 2 groups (pre, n = 133; post, n = 136) did not significantly differ with respect to age, race, education, or personal DV history. The majority endorsed that "it is appropriate to have DV posters," with the post group responding in this manner more often than the pre group (pre, 85%; post, 95%; odds ratio [OR], 3.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-8.5). The post group was less likely to prefer pediatric ED DV screening (pre, 76%; post, 63%; OR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3-0.9) and tended to be less likely to say that they would divulge (pre, 85%; post, 75%; OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.3-1.1). In both groups, women with a DV history were less likely than women without this history to say that they would disclose DV to their pediatric ED provider (P <0.001). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest the need for further exploration of how to most effectively help and provide resources for abused women in this setting.

AB - OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to examine female caregivers' attitudes about the display of domestic violence (DV) resources in a pediatric emergency department (ED) and to explore whether these resources engendered positive feelings about DV screening and encouraged disclosure. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey in a pediatric ED during 2 distinct periods, comparing responses of female caregivers before (pre) and after (post) displaying DV posters and cards. Women were surveyed about (1) personal experience with DV, (2) the appropriateness of DV posters and screening in a pediatric ED, and (3) willingness to divulge DV, if abused. RESULTS: The 2 groups (pre, n = 133; post, n = 136) did not significantly differ with respect to age, race, education, or personal DV history. The majority endorsed that "it is appropriate to have DV posters," with the post group responding in this manner more often than the pre group (pre, 85%; post, 95%; odds ratio [OR], 3.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-8.5). The post group was less likely to prefer pediatric ED DV screening (pre, 76%; post, 63%; OR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3-0.9) and tended to be less likely to say that they would divulge (pre, 85%; post, 75%; OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.3-1.1). In both groups, women with a DV history were less likely than women without this history to say that they would disclose DV to their pediatric ED provider (P <0.001). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest the need for further exploration of how to most effectively help and provide resources for abused women in this setting.

KW - Domestic violence

KW - Resources

KW - Screening

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33751165042&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33751165042&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/01.pec.0000238742.96606.20

DO - 10.1097/01.pec.0000238742.96606.20

M3 - Article

C2 - 17110858

AN - SCOPUS:33751165042

VL - 22

SP - 689

EP - 693

JO - Pediatric Emergency Care

JF - Pediatric Emergency Care

SN - 0749-5161

IS - 11

ER -