Impact of complete revascularization on long-term survival after coronary artery bypass grafting in octogenarians

Benjamin D. Kozower, Marc R. Moon, Hendrick B. Barner, Nader Moazami, Jennifer S. Lawton, Michael K. Pasque, Ralph J. Damiano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. Complete revascularization is important in young patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, but this principle remains less absolute in elderly patients. The purpose of this study was to determine how complete revascularization influenced long-term survival after coronary artery bypass grafting in octogenarians. Methods. From 1986 to 2003, 500 consecutive patients 80 to 94 years of age underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. Complete revascularization was defined as placement of at least one graft to each of the three major vascular regions that included a 50% diameter lesion. Revascularization was complete in 400 (80%) patients and incomplete in 100 (20%) patients. Mean (± standard deviation) follow-up was 51 ± 41 months and was 99% complete (2,102 total patient-years). Results. Operative mortality was 8% ± 2% (±95% confidence interval) and was statistically lower with complete (7% ± 3%) versus incomplete (13% ± 7%) revascularization (p < 0.05). Of 459 operative survivors, there were 261 late deaths. Multivariate regression analysis identified six independent predictors of late death: earlier operative year, male sex, peripheral or cerebrovascular disease, congestive heart failure, and incomplete revascularization (p < 0.03 for all). Excluding operative deaths, mean survival (Kaplan-Meier) was 82 months with complete revascularization compared with 65 months with incomplete revascularization (p < 0.008). Survival was 62% ± 3% with complete versus 45% ± 6% with incomplete revascularization at 5 years and 39% ± 3% with complete versus 25% ± 6% with incomplete revascularization at 8 years (p < 0.008). Conclusions. In octogenarians undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, complete revascularization correlated with improved long-term survival, increasing mean survival by almost 25% compared with incomplete revascularization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)112-117
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume80
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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