Impact of breast milk on respiratory outcomes in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The objective of our study was to examine whether outpatient respiratory morbidities in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) are influenced by the human milk consumption. Methods: Caregivers of subjects recruited from a BPD clinic completed questionnaires regarding breast milk intake and respiratory outcomes. Results: One-hundred eighty-eight caregivers completed the questionnaire. Of these, 173 (92.0%) reported that the child received some breast milk. Infants who received breast milk for fewer months were more likely to be non-white, and have a lower household income, public insurance, and secondhand smoke exposure. A longer receipt of breast milk was associated with reduced likelihoods of emergency department visits, systemic steroid courses, and cough or chest congestion, and a trend towards a lower risk of re-hospitalizations. Conclusions: Longer duration of breast milk intake was associated with markers of higher socio-economic status, and reduced likelihood of acute and chronic respiratory morbidities among preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatric Pulmonology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia
Human Milk
Caregivers
Morbidity
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Insurance
Cough
Premature Infants
Hospital Emergency Service
Hospitalization
Outpatients
Thorax
Steroids
Economics

Keywords

  • breast milk
  • bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD)
  • epidemiology
  • neonatal pulmonary medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Impact of breast milk on respiratory outcomes in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia",
abstract = "Background: The objective of our study was to examine whether outpatient respiratory morbidities in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) are influenced by the human milk consumption. Methods: Caregivers of subjects recruited from a BPD clinic completed questionnaires regarding breast milk intake and respiratory outcomes. Results: One-hundred eighty-eight caregivers completed the questionnaire. Of these, 173 (92.0{\%}) reported that the child received some breast milk. Infants who received breast milk for fewer months were more likely to be non-white, and have a lower household income, public insurance, and secondhand smoke exposure. A longer receipt of breast milk was associated with reduced likelihoods of emergency department visits, systemic steroid courses, and cough or chest congestion, and a trend towards a lower risk of re-hospitalizations. Conclusions: Longer duration of breast milk intake was associated with markers of higher socio-economic status, and reduced likelihood of acute and chronic respiratory morbidities among preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.",
keywords = "breast milk, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), epidemiology, neonatal pulmonary medicine",
author = "Lydia Kim and McGrath-Morrow, {Sharon A} and Michael Collaco",
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AU - McGrath-Morrow, Sharon A

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N2 - Background: The objective of our study was to examine whether outpatient respiratory morbidities in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) are influenced by the human milk consumption. Methods: Caregivers of subjects recruited from a BPD clinic completed questionnaires regarding breast milk intake and respiratory outcomes. Results: One-hundred eighty-eight caregivers completed the questionnaire. Of these, 173 (92.0%) reported that the child received some breast milk. Infants who received breast milk for fewer months were more likely to be non-white, and have a lower household income, public insurance, and secondhand smoke exposure. A longer receipt of breast milk was associated with reduced likelihoods of emergency department visits, systemic steroid courses, and cough or chest congestion, and a trend towards a lower risk of re-hospitalizations. Conclusions: Longer duration of breast milk intake was associated with markers of higher socio-economic status, and reduced likelihood of acute and chronic respiratory morbidities among preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

AB - Background: The objective of our study was to examine whether outpatient respiratory morbidities in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) are influenced by the human milk consumption. Methods: Caregivers of subjects recruited from a BPD clinic completed questionnaires regarding breast milk intake and respiratory outcomes. Results: One-hundred eighty-eight caregivers completed the questionnaire. Of these, 173 (92.0%) reported that the child received some breast milk. Infants who received breast milk for fewer months were more likely to be non-white, and have a lower household income, public insurance, and secondhand smoke exposure. A longer receipt of breast milk was associated with reduced likelihoods of emergency department visits, systemic steroid courses, and cough or chest congestion, and a trend towards a lower risk of re-hospitalizations. Conclusions: Longer duration of breast milk intake was associated with markers of higher socio-economic status, and reduced likelihood of acute and chronic respiratory morbidities among preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

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