Impact of Aspergillus fumigatus in allergic airway diseases

Neelkamal Chaudhary, Kieren Marr

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

For decades, fungi have been recognized as associated with asthma and other reactive airway diseases. In contrast to type I-mediated allergies caused by pollen, fungi cause a large number of allergic diseases such as allergic bronchopulmonary mycoses, rhinitis, allergic sinusitis and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Amongst the fungi, Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent cause of severe pulmonary allergic disease, including allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), known to be associated with chronic lung injury and deterioration in pulmonary function in people with chronic asthma and cystic fibrosis (CF). The goal of this review is to discuss new understandings of host-pathogen interactions in the genesis of allergic airway diseases caused by A. fumigatus. Host and pathogen related factors that participate in triggering the inflammatory cycle leading to pulmonary exacerbations in ABPA are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalClinical and Translational Allergy
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 10 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

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