Impact of a contemplative end-of-life training program: Being with dying

Cynthia H Rushton, Deborah E. Sellers, Karen S. Heller, Beverly Spring, Barbara M. Dossey, Joan Halifax

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Health care professionals report a lack of skills in the psychosocial and spiritual aspects of caring for dying people and high levels of moral distress, grief, and burnout. To address these concerns, the Being with Dying: Professional Training Program in Contemplative End-of-Life Care (BWD) was created. The premise of BWD, which is based on the development of mindfulness and receptive attention through contemplative practice, is that cultivating stability of mind and emotions enables clinicians to respond to others and themselves with compassion. This article describes the impact of BWD on the participants.Methods: Ninety-five BWD participants completed an anonymous online survey; 40 completed a confidential open-ended telephone interview.Results: Four main themesthe power of presence, cultivating balanced compassion, recognizing grief, and the importance of self-careemerged in the interviews and were supported in the survey data. The interviewees considered BWD's contemplative and reflective practices meaningful, useful, and valuable and reported that BWD provided skills, attitudes, behaviors, and tools to change how they worked with the dying and bereaved.Significance of results: The quality of presence has the potential to transform the care of dying people and the caregivers themselves. Cultivating this quality within themselves and others allows clinicians to explore alternatives to exclusively intellectual, procedural, and task-oriented approaches when caring for dying people. BWD provides a rare opportunity to engage in practices and methods that cultivate the stability of mind and emotions that may facilitate compassionate care of dying patients, families, and caregivers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)405-414
Number of pages10
JournalPalliative & supportive care
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2009

Fingerprint

Education
Grief
Caregivers
Emotions
Interviews
Mindfulness
Terminal Care
Patient Care
Delivery of Health Care
Surveys and Questionnaires
Power (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Contemplative
  • End of life
  • Interdisciplinary
  • Professional education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Impact of a contemplative end-of-life training program : Being with dying. / Rushton, Cynthia H; Sellers, Deborah E.; Heller, Karen S.; Spring, Beverly; Dossey, Barbara M.; Halifax, Joan.

In: Palliative & supportive care, Vol. 7, No. 4, 12.2009, p. 405-414.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rushton, CH, Sellers, DE, Heller, KS, Spring, B, Dossey, BM & Halifax, J 2009, 'Impact of a contemplative end-of-life training program: Being with dying', Palliative & supportive care, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 405-414. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1478951509990411
Rushton, Cynthia H ; Sellers, Deborah E. ; Heller, Karen S. ; Spring, Beverly ; Dossey, Barbara M. ; Halifax, Joan. / Impact of a contemplative end-of-life training program : Being with dying. In: Palliative & supportive care. 2009 ; Vol. 7, No. 4. pp. 405-414.
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