Immunotherapy of intraperitoneal cancer with interleukin 2 and lymphokine-activated killer cells reduces tumor load and prolongs survival in murine models

Reyer T. Ottow, E. Philip Steller, Paul H. Sugarbaker, Robert A. Wesley, Steven A. Rosenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The control of malignancy disseminated within the peritoneal cavity is an important problem in the management of low-grade gastrointestinal and ovarian neoplasms. A model of peritoneal carcinomatosis in the mouse was used to investigate the potential of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells and exogenous interleukin 2 (IL-2) to control intraperitoneal tumor. LAK cells are splenocytes activated in vitro by IL-2. C57BL/6 mice were injected intraperitoneally with a lethal inoculum of syngeneic MCA-105 tumor. Three days later, the established tumor was treated with adoptively transferred LAK cells and/or exogenous IL-2 administration. LAK cells alone were ineffective in reducing intraperitoneal tumor. Administration of IL-2 alone resulted in limited tumor reduction. Treatment with exogenous IL-2 in conjunction with LAK cells resulted in the greatest reduction of intraperitoneal tumor. The larger the number of LAK cells given, the greater the reduction in tumor. Frequent intraperitoneal bolus administration of IL-2 was more effective than a single daily intraperitoneal injection and intraperitoneal administration of IL-2 and LAK was more effective than systemic treatments. Marked prolongation of life was seen in mice treated with LAK cells plus exogenous IL-2. We conclude that intraperitoneal LAK cells plus exogenous IL-2 is an effective treatment regimen for reducing intraperitoneal tumor in this murine model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)366-376
Number of pages11
JournalCellular Immunology
Volume104
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1987

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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