Immunoregulatory adherent cells in human tuberculosis: Radiation-sensitive antigen-specific suppression by monocytes

M. E. Kleinhenz, J. J. Ellner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In human tuberculosis, adherent mononuclear cells (AMC) selectively depress in vitro responses to the mycobacterial antigen tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD). The phenotype of this antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell was characterized by examining the functional activity of adherent cells after selective depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or OKM1-reactive monocytes. Adherent cell suppression was studied in the [3H]thymidine-incorporation microculture assay by using T cells rigorously depleted of T cells with surface receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (Tγ cells) as antigen-responsive cells. PPD-induced [3H]thymidine incorporation by these nonγ T cells was uniformly reduced (mean, 42% ± 10% [SD]) when autologous AMC were added to nonγ T cells at a ratio of 1:2. Antigen-specific suppression by AMC was not altered by depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or treatment with indomethacin. However, AMC treated with OKM1 and complement or γ irradiation (1,500 rads) no longer suppressed tuberculin responses in vitro. These studies identify the antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell in tuberculosis as an OKM1-reactive, non-erythrocyte-rosetting monocyte. The radiosensitivity of this monocyte immunoregulatory function may facilitate its further definition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-176
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume152
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1985
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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