Immunologic aspects of scleroderma

B. White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Many distinct areas of investigation contribute to the understanding of immune abnormalities in systemic sclerosis. Recent immunohistochemical studies question the causal relationship of increased transforming growth factor-β expression to dermal fibrosis. RNA polymerase I, II, and III have been identified as autoantigens specific for systemic sclerosis. Anti-RNA polymerase antibodies are directed against both unique and shared subunits of the multiprotein complexes. The targeting of several subunits suggests that the entire complexes are processed and presented by antigen-presenting cells. Genetic studies show that both HLA-DR and HLA-DQ genes control the antitopoisomerase response in Japanese patients. The null allele of the complement component C4 and HLA-DQA2 have been identified as two independent disease susceptibility genes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)612-615
Number of pages4
JournalCurrent Opinion in Rheumatology
Volume6
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Systemic Scleroderma
RNA Polymerase I
RNA Polymerase III
HLA-DQ Antigens
Complement C4
Multiprotein Complexes
RNA Polymerase II
Disease Susceptibility
Autoantigens
Transforming Growth Factors
HLA-DR Antigens
Antigen-Presenting Cells
DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases
Genes
Fibrosis
Alleles
Skin
Antibodies
HLA-DQA2 antigen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Immunologic aspects of scleroderma. / White, B.

In: Current Opinion in Rheumatology, Vol. 6, No. 6, 1994, p. 612-615.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

White, B 1994, 'Immunologic aspects of scleroderma', Current Opinion in Rheumatology, vol. 6, no. 6, pp. 612-615.
White, B. / Immunologic aspects of scleroderma. In: Current Opinion in Rheumatology. 1994 ; Vol. 6, No. 6. pp. 612-615.
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