Immunohistochemical localization of blood-retinal barrier breakdown sites associated with post-surgical macular oedema

Stanley A. Vinores, Abha Amin, Nancy L. Derevjanik, W. Richard Green, Peter A Campochiaro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Post-surgical macular oedema results from blood-retinal barrier breakdown, but it is not accompanied by structural abnormalities in the retinal vessels or retinal pigmented epithelium. Previous studies, using horseradish peroxidase in a primate model, suggested that leakage occurs primarily through this epithelium. This study was conducted to localize sites of the barrier breakdown in humans following different types of intra-ocular surgery and to compare them with eyes affected with ocular inflammatory disease, ocular infection, and choroidal melanoma. Paraffin sections of eyes were immunohistochemically stained for albumin to localize extravascular albumin, which was graded in a masked study. With aphakia/pseudophakia, penetrating keratoplasty, ocular inflammatory disease, ocular infection, and choroidal melanoma, barrier breakdown occurred primarily at the inner blood-retinal barrier (retinal vasculature), but leakage also occurred at the outer barrier (retinal pigmented epithelium). After retinal re-attachment surgery, the inner and outer blood-retinal barriers were equally compromised. Vascular leakage in the optic nerve head coincided with barrier failure in these disorders. The widespread pattern of blood-retinal barrier compromise with leakage at multiple sites suggests that soluble mediators are likely to play a role in postsurgical macular oedema, ocular inflammatory disease, and choroidal melanoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)655-665
Number of pages11
JournalThe Histochemical Journal
Volume26
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1994

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Blood-Retinal Barrier
Macular Edema
Eye Diseases
Eye Infections
Melanoma
Epithelium
Albumins
Pseudophakia
Aphakia
Retinal Vessels
Penetrating Keratoplasty
Optic Disk
Horseradish Peroxidase
Paraffin
Primates
Blood Vessels

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Immunohistochemical localization of blood-retinal barrier breakdown sites associated with post-surgical macular oedema. / Vinores, Stanley A.; Amin, Abha; Derevjanik, Nancy L.; Green, W. Richard; Campochiaro, Peter A.

In: The Histochemical Journal, Vol. 26, No. 8, 08.1994, p. 655-665.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vinores, Stanley A. ; Amin, Abha ; Derevjanik, Nancy L. ; Green, W. Richard ; Campochiaro, Peter A. / Immunohistochemical localization of blood-retinal barrier breakdown sites associated with post-surgical macular oedema. In: The Histochemical Journal. 1994 ; Vol. 26, No. 8. pp. 655-665.
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