Immune-Related Adverse Events From Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Immunotherapy for cancer treatment has come of age, specifically with the use of immune checkpoint antibodies directed against molecules such as CTLA-4, PD-1, and PD-L1. Single-agent and combinatorial approaches utilizing these agents and other immunotherapies that may enhance antitumor effects are under investigation. With increasing clinical use of these agents, an appreciation for their toxicities comes to the fore. Adverse events that occur as a result of the immunologic effects of these therapies are termed “immune-related adverse events” (irAEs), and range in both frequency and severity in reported single-agent and combination studies. Improvements in our understanding of how and why irAEs develop and how to effectively manage them are needed. Herein we provide a state-of-the-art synopsis of the incidence, clinical features, mechanisms, and management of selected irAEs with immune checkpoint inhibitors currently in use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)242-251
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume100
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

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Immunotherapy
Antibodies
Incidence
Therapeutics
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Immune-Related Adverse Events From Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors. / Marrone, Kristen; Ying, W.; Naidoo, Jarushka.

In: Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 100, No. 3, 2016, p. 242-251.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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