Immune reconstitution following hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation: Challenges for the future

T. J. Fry, C. L. Mackall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Successful hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation requires rapid and complete transfer of the donor hematopoietic and immune systems to the host. Whereas the uncontrolled transfer of a nontolerant donor immune system results in GVHD in many cases, strategies which diminish GVHD also diminish immune reconstitution. Thus, the reliable, rapid and safe transfer of immunity from donor to host remains a major challenge for the field. Advances in the understanding of the biology of immune reconstitution have elucidated that thymic-dependent immune reconstitution can restore global immunity, but is especially vulnerable to toxicities associated with transplant. Alternatively, homeostatic peripheral expansion can be exploited for targeted immunity toward pathogens and tumors, but is difficult to manipulate without exacerbating GVHD risk. New translatable strategies are needed to safely augment one or both of these pathways in the setting of allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S53-S57
JournalBone marrow transplantation
Volume35
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

Keywords

  • GVHD
  • Homeostatic peripheral expansion
  • IL-7
  • Keratinocyte growth factor
  • Thymopoiesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Transplantation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Immune reconstitution following hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation: Challenges for the future'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this