Immediate quantitation of antiarrhythmic drug effect by monophasic action potential recording in coronary artery disease

Edward V. Platia, Myron L. Weisfeldt, Michael R. Franz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A contact electrode catheter, which permits clinical recording of cardiac monophasic action potentials (MAPs), was used as a means of quantifying the electrophysiologfc effect of 2 antiarrhythmic drugs, procainamide and quinidine. MAP recordings were made in continuous fashion from the right ventricle in 16 patients, before and after the intravenous administration of procainamide (11 patients) or quinidine (5). Increases in the MAP duration at 90% repolarization (MAPD90) were used as indexes of drug effect and related to plasma drug level. Surface electrocardiographic (QRS duration, corrected QT interval [QTC) and electrophysiologic (ventricular effective refractory period) measurements, in addition to MAPD90, were made at the same time as blood sampling for plasma drug level determination. Dose response curves, plotting change in MAPD90 versus plasma drug level, showed strong linear correlation for both procainamide (p < 0.0001) and quinidine (p < 0.0001). The variance (error of estimation) of the predictive relation, change in MAPD90 versus plasma drug level, was significantly tower than that of change in QTC (p < 0.001), QRS duration (p < 0.0001) or ventricular effective refractory period (p < 0.0001) versus plasma drug level for both procainamide and quinidine. Changes in MAP duration closely correlate with plasma drug level, and as such, may serve as an immediate, quantitative indicator of myocardial drug effect during the administration of antiarrhythmic agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1284-1287
Number of pages4
JournalThe American journal of cardiology
Volume61
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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