Imaging brain deoxyglucose uptake and metabolism by glucoCEST MRI

Fatima A. Nasrallah, Guilhem Pagès, Philip W. Kuchel, Xavier Golay, Kai Hsiang Chuang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) is a known surrogate molecule that is useful for inferring glucose uptake and metabolism. Although 13 C-labeled 2DG can be detected by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), its low sensitivity for detection prohibits imaging to be performed. Using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) as a signal-amplification mechanism, 2DG and the phosphorylated 2DG-6-phosphate (2DG6P) can be indirectly detected in 1 H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We showed that the CEST signal changed with 2DG concentration, and was reduced by suppressing cerebral metabolism with increased general anesthetic. The signal changes were not affected by cerebral or plasma pH, and were not correlated with altered cerebral blood flow as demonstrated by hypercapnia; neither were they related to the extracellular glucose amounts as compared with injection of D-and L-glucose. In vivo 31 P NMR revealed similar changes in 2DG6P concentration, suggesting that the CEST signal reflected the rate of glucose assimilation. This method provides a new way to use widely available MRI techniques to image deoxyglucose/glucose uptake and metabolism in vivo without the need for isotopic labeling of the molecules.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1270-1278
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
Volume33
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Deoxyglucose
Neuroimaging
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Glucose
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
General Anesthetics
Glucose-6-Phosphate
Hypercapnia
Phosphates
Injections

Keywords

  • 2-deoxyglucose
  • glucoCEST
  • glucose
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • metabolism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Nasrallah, F. A., Pagès, G., Kuchel, P. W., Golay, X., & Chuang, K. H. (2013). Imaging brain deoxyglucose uptake and metabolism by glucoCEST MRI. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 33(8), 1270-1278. https://doi.org/10.1038/jcbfm.2013.79

Imaging brain deoxyglucose uptake and metabolism by glucoCEST MRI. / Nasrallah, Fatima A.; Pagès, Guilhem; Kuchel, Philip W.; Golay, Xavier; Chuang, Kai Hsiang.

In: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, Vol. 33, No. 8, 08.2013, p. 1270-1278.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nasrallah, FA, Pagès, G, Kuchel, PW, Golay, X & Chuang, KH 2013, 'Imaging brain deoxyglucose uptake and metabolism by glucoCEST MRI', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, vol. 33, no. 8, pp. 1270-1278. https://doi.org/10.1038/jcbfm.2013.79
Nasrallah, Fatima A. ; Pagès, Guilhem ; Kuchel, Philip W. ; Golay, Xavier ; Chuang, Kai Hsiang. / Imaging brain deoxyglucose uptake and metabolism by glucoCEST MRI. In: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism. 2013 ; Vol. 33, No. 8. pp. 1270-1278.
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