Illness among US resident student travellers after return to the USA: a GeoSentinel analysis, 2007-17

Kristina M. Angelo, N. Jean Haulman, Anne C. Terry, Daniel T. Leung, Lin H. Chen, Elizabeth D. Barnett, Stefan H.F. Hagmann, Noreen A Hynes, Bradley A. Connor, Susan Anderson, Anne McCarthy, Marc Shaw, Perry J.J. Van Genderen, Davidson H. Hamer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The number of US students studying abroad more than tripled during the past 20 years. As study abroad programmes' destinations diversify, students increasingly travel to resource-limited countries, placing them at risk for infectious diseases. Data describing infections acquired by US students while travelling internationally are limited. We describe illnesses among students who returned from international travel and suggest how to prevent illness among these travellers. Methods: GeoSentinel is a global surveillance network of travel and tropical medicine providers that monitors travel-related morbidity. This study included the records of US resident student international travellers, 17-24 years old, who returned to the USA, had a confirmed travel-related illness at one of 15 US GeoSentinel sites during 2007-17 and had a documented exposure region. Records were analysed to describe demographic and travel characteristics and diagnoses. Results: The study included 432 students. The median age was 21 years; 69% were female. More than 70% had a pre-travel consultation with a healthcare provider. The most common exposure region was sub-Saharan Africa (112; 26%). Students were most commonly exposed in India (44; 11%), Ecuador (28; 7%), Ghana (25; 6%) and China (24; 6%). The median duration of travel abroad was 40 days (range: 1-469) and presented to a GeoSentinel site a median of 8 days (range: 0-181) after travel; 98% were outpatients. Of 581 confirmed diagnoses, the most common diagnosis category was gastrointestinal (45%). Acute diarrhoea was the most common gastrointestinal diagnosis (113 of 261; 43%). Thirty-one (7%) students had vector-borne diseases [14 (41%) malaria and 11 (32%) dengue]. Three had vaccine-preventable diseases (two typhoid; one hepatitis A); two had acute human immunodeficiency virus infection. Conclusions: Students experienced travel-related infections, despite the majority having a pre-travel consultation. US students should receive pre-travel advice, vaccinations and chemoprophylaxis to prevent gastrointestinal, vector-borne, sexually transmitted and vaccine-preventable infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of travel medicine
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Students
Referral and Consultation
Vaccines
Infection
Travel Medicine
Ecuador
Tropical Medicine
Disease Vectors
Ghana
Hepatitis A
Dengue
Africa South of the Sahara
Typhoid Fever
Chemoprevention
Virus Diseases
Health Personnel
Malaria
Communicable Diseases
India
Diarrhea

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Angelo, K. M., Haulman, N. J., Terry, A. C., Leung, D. T., Chen, L. H., Barnett, E. D., ... Hamer, D. H. (2018). Illness among US resident student travellers after return to the USA: a GeoSentinel analysis, 2007-17. Journal of travel medicine, 25(1). https://doi.org/10.1093/jtm/tay074

Illness among US resident student travellers after return to the USA : a GeoSentinel analysis, 2007-17. / Angelo, Kristina M.; Haulman, N. Jean; Terry, Anne C.; Leung, Daniel T.; Chen, Lin H.; Barnett, Elizabeth D.; Hagmann, Stefan H.F.; Hynes, Noreen A; Connor, Bradley A.; Anderson, Susan; McCarthy, Anne; Shaw, Marc; Van Genderen, Perry J.J.; Hamer, Davidson H.

In: Journal of travel medicine, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Angelo, KM, Haulman, NJ, Terry, AC, Leung, DT, Chen, LH, Barnett, ED, Hagmann, SHF, Hynes, NA, Connor, BA, Anderson, S, McCarthy, A, Shaw, M, Van Genderen, PJJ & Hamer, DH 2018, 'Illness among US resident student travellers after return to the USA: a GeoSentinel analysis, 2007-17', Journal of travel medicine, vol. 25, no. 1. https://doi.org/10.1093/jtm/tay074
Angelo, Kristina M. ; Haulman, N. Jean ; Terry, Anne C. ; Leung, Daniel T. ; Chen, Lin H. ; Barnett, Elizabeth D. ; Hagmann, Stefan H.F. ; Hynes, Noreen A ; Connor, Bradley A. ; Anderson, Susan ; McCarthy, Anne ; Shaw, Marc ; Van Genderen, Perry J.J. ; Hamer, Davidson H. / Illness among US resident student travellers after return to the USA : a GeoSentinel analysis, 2007-17. In: Journal of travel medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 25, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background: The number of US students studying abroad more than tripled during the past 20 years. As study abroad programmes' destinations diversify, students increasingly travel to resource-limited countries, placing them at risk for infectious diseases. Data describing infections acquired by US students while travelling internationally are limited. We describe illnesses among students who returned from international travel and suggest how to prevent illness among these travellers. Methods: GeoSentinel is a global surveillance network of travel and tropical medicine providers that monitors travel-related morbidity. This study included the records of US resident student international travellers, 17-24 years old, who returned to the USA, had a confirmed travel-related illness at one of 15 US GeoSentinel sites during 2007-17 and had a documented exposure region. Records were analysed to describe demographic and travel characteristics and diagnoses. Results: The study included 432 students. The median age was 21 years; 69{\%} were female. More than 70{\%} had a pre-travel consultation with a healthcare provider. The most common exposure region was sub-Saharan Africa (112; 26{\%}). Students were most commonly exposed in India (44; 11{\%}), Ecuador (28; 7{\%}), Ghana (25; 6{\%}) and China (24; 6{\%}). The median duration of travel abroad was 40 days (range: 1-469) and presented to a GeoSentinel site a median of 8 days (range: 0-181) after travel; 98{\%} were outpatients. Of 581 confirmed diagnoses, the most common diagnosis category was gastrointestinal (45{\%}). Acute diarrhoea was the most common gastrointestinal diagnosis (113 of 261; 43{\%}). Thirty-one (7{\%}) students had vector-borne diseases [14 (41{\%}) malaria and 11 (32{\%}) dengue]. Three had vaccine-preventable diseases (two typhoid; one hepatitis A); two had acute human immunodeficiency virus infection. Conclusions: Students experienced travel-related infections, despite the majority having a pre-travel consultation. US students should receive pre-travel advice, vaccinations and chemoprophylaxis to prevent gastrointestinal, vector-borne, sexually transmitted and vaccine-preventable infections.",
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AU - Leung, Daniel T.

AU - Chen, Lin H.

AU - Barnett, Elizabeth D.

AU - Hagmann, Stefan H.F.

AU - Hynes, Noreen A

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