IgA, IgG and IgM quantification in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from allergic rhinitics, allergic asthmatics, and normal subjects by monoclonal antibody-based immunoenzymetric assays

R. Stokes Peebles, Mark Chang Hwa Liu, Lawrence M. Lichtenstein, Robert G Hamilton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent reports have suggested that human secretory IgA (sIgA) may have a role in the mediation of atopic disease. We have studied the levels of sIgA, IgA, IgG and IgM in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids collected from lungs of healthy non-allergic adults (n = 14), allergic subjects with rhinitis (n = 15), and allergic asthmatics (n = 13), using a panel of monoclonal antibody-based immunoenzymetric assays (IEMAs). In contrast to commercially available immunodiffusion and nephelometric assays, these IEMAs employ highly specific monoclonal antibodies and demonstrate required precision (intra-assay CVs <17%), parallelism (inter-dilutional CVs <20%) at minimal detectable immunoglobulin levels in the ng/ml range, and excellent specificity with <0.1% crossreactivity for heterologous immunoglobulin isotypes. Using these assays, we have observed a significant correlation between sIgA levels and total IgA levels in BAL fluids from all the study patients (r = 0.94; p <0.01). The percentage of sIgA to total IgA was 84.0 ± 2.2%. sIgA in BAL fluids from allergic rhinitics (18.0 ± 2.5 μg/ml) and allergic asthmatics (15.5 ± 2.5 μg/ml) were higher than those from nonallergic subjects (10.2 ± 1.9 μg/ml). The only statistically significant difference in sIgA levels was observed in BAL fluids from the rhinitics and nonallergic groups (p = 0.03). Similar differences among the groups were found for levels of total IgA in BAL fluid. There were no significant differences in the levels of IgM and IgG in BAL fluids among the three groups of subjects. We conclude from these results that IgA is the predominant immunoglobulin on the airway surface and that it appears to be produced locally.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-86
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Immunological Methods
Volume179
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Secretory Immunoglobulin A
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid
Immunoglobulin A
Immunoglobulin M
Immunoglobulin G
Monoclonal Antibodies
Immunoglobulins
Immunoglobulin Isotypes
Immunodiffusion
Rhinitis
Lung

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Immunoenzymetric assay
  • Monoclonal antibody
  • Secretory IgA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Biotechnology

Cite this

@article{cb36b24781b9494c838c4941a7e5c2e3,
title = "IgA, IgG and IgM quantification in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from allergic rhinitics, allergic asthmatics, and normal subjects by monoclonal antibody-based immunoenzymetric assays",
abstract = "Recent reports have suggested that human secretory IgA (sIgA) may have a role in the mediation of atopic disease. We have studied the levels of sIgA, IgA, IgG and IgM in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids collected from lungs of healthy non-allergic adults (n = 14), allergic subjects with rhinitis (n = 15), and allergic asthmatics (n = 13), using a panel of monoclonal antibody-based immunoenzymetric assays (IEMAs). In contrast to commercially available immunodiffusion and nephelometric assays, these IEMAs employ highly specific monoclonal antibodies and demonstrate required precision (intra-assay CVs <17{\%}), parallelism (inter-dilutional CVs <20{\%}) at minimal detectable immunoglobulin levels in the ng/ml range, and excellent specificity with <0.1{\%} crossreactivity for heterologous immunoglobulin isotypes. Using these assays, we have observed a significant correlation between sIgA levels and total IgA levels in BAL fluids from all the study patients (r = 0.94; p <0.01). The percentage of sIgA to total IgA was 84.0 ± 2.2{\%}. sIgA in BAL fluids from allergic rhinitics (18.0 ± 2.5 μg/ml) and allergic asthmatics (15.5 ± 2.5 μg/ml) were higher than those from nonallergic subjects (10.2 ± 1.9 μg/ml). The only statistically significant difference in sIgA levels was observed in BAL fluids from the rhinitics and nonallergic groups (p = 0.03). Similar differences among the groups were found for levels of total IgA in BAL fluid. There were no significant differences in the levels of IgM and IgG in BAL fluids among the three groups of subjects. We conclude from these results that IgA is the predominant immunoglobulin on the airway surface and that it appears to be produced locally.",
keywords = "Asthma, Immunoenzymetric assay, Monoclonal antibody, Secretory IgA",
author = "{Stokes Peebles}, R. and Liu, {Mark Chang Hwa} and Lichtenstein, {Lawrence M.} and Hamilton, {Robert G}",
year = "1995",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "179",
pages = "77--86",
journal = "Journal of Immunological Methods",
issn = "0022-1759",
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T1 - IgA, IgG and IgM quantification in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from allergic rhinitics, allergic asthmatics, and normal subjects by monoclonal antibody-based immunoenzymetric assays

AU - Stokes Peebles, R.

AU - Liu, Mark Chang Hwa

AU - Lichtenstein, Lawrence M.

AU - Hamilton, Robert G

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - Recent reports have suggested that human secretory IgA (sIgA) may have a role in the mediation of atopic disease. We have studied the levels of sIgA, IgA, IgG and IgM in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids collected from lungs of healthy non-allergic adults (n = 14), allergic subjects with rhinitis (n = 15), and allergic asthmatics (n = 13), using a panel of monoclonal antibody-based immunoenzymetric assays (IEMAs). In contrast to commercially available immunodiffusion and nephelometric assays, these IEMAs employ highly specific monoclonal antibodies and demonstrate required precision (intra-assay CVs <17%), parallelism (inter-dilutional CVs <20%) at minimal detectable immunoglobulin levels in the ng/ml range, and excellent specificity with <0.1% crossreactivity for heterologous immunoglobulin isotypes. Using these assays, we have observed a significant correlation between sIgA levels and total IgA levels in BAL fluids from all the study patients (r = 0.94; p <0.01). The percentage of sIgA to total IgA was 84.0 ± 2.2%. sIgA in BAL fluids from allergic rhinitics (18.0 ± 2.5 μg/ml) and allergic asthmatics (15.5 ± 2.5 μg/ml) were higher than those from nonallergic subjects (10.2 ± 1.9 μg/ml). The only statistically significant difference in sIgA levels was observed in BAL fluids from the rhinitics and nonallergic groups (p = 0.03). Similar differences among the groups were found for levels of total IgA in BAL fluid. There were no significant differences in the levels of IgM and IgG in BAL fluids among the three groups of subjects. We conclude from these results that IgA is the predominant immunoglobulin on the airway surface and that it appears to be produced locally.

AB - Recent reports have suggested that human secretory IgA (sIgA) may have a role in the mediation of atopic disease. We have studied the levels of sIgA, IgA, IgG and IgM in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids collected from lungs of healthy non-allergic adults (n = 14), allergic subjects with rhinitis (n = 15), and allergic asthmatics (n = 13), using a panel of monoclonal antibody-based immunoenzymetric assays (IEMAs). In contrast to commercially available immunodiffusion and nephelometric assays, these IEMAs employ highly specific monoclonal antibodies and demonstrate required precision (intra-assay CVs <17%), parallelism (inter-dilutional CVs <20%) at minimal detectable immunoglobulin levels in the ng/ml range, and excellent specificity with <0.1% crossreactivity for heterologous immunoglobulin isotypes. Using these assays, we have observed a significant correlation between sIgA levels and total IgA levels in BAL fluids from all the study patients (r = 0.94; p <0.01). The percentage of sIgA to total IgA was 84.0 ± 2.2%. sIgA in BAL fluids from allergic rhinitics (18.0 ± 2.5 μg/ml) and allergic asthmatics (15.5 ± 2.5 μg/ml) were higher than those from nonallergic subjects (10.2 ± 1.9 μg/ml). The only statistically significant difference in sIgA levels was observed in BAL fluids from the rhinitics and nonallergic groups (p = 0.03). Similar differences among the groups were found for levels of total IgA in BAL fluid. There were no significant differences in the levels of IgM and IgG in BAL fluids among the three groups of subjects. We conclude from these results that IgA is the predominant immunoglobulin on the airway surface and that it appears to be produced locally.

KW - Asthma

KW - Immunoenzymetric assay

KW - Monoclonal antibody

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