Idiopathic intracranial hypertension progressing to venous sinus thrombosis, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and stroke

Joshua S. Hardin, Raghu H. Ramakrishnaiah, John D. Pemberton, Paul H. Phillips, Joseph G. Chacko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a syndrome characterized by increased intracranial pressure (ICP), the absence of structural lesions on neuroimaging, and normal cerebrospinal fluid composition. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a common cause of increased ICP and can be differentiated from IIH with magnetic resonance venography. We describe a young woman with typical IIH who underwent lumbar puncture and was treated with a short course of high-dose corticosteroids followed by acetazolamide. She subsequently developed CVST, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and stroke. Risk factors that may have resulted in CVST are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)60-64
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neuro-Ophthalmology
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Clinical Neurology

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