Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

M. E. Cronin, P. H. Plotz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are a heterogeneous group of uncommon diseases. The incidence rate of IIM is approximately 5 cases per million population, but there appears to be an increase in the rate over the last two decades, particularly in black females. This may be a true increase or due to renewed interest and awareness of the disease and improvement in our ability to diagnose mild disease. There has also been progress in decreasing the mortality rate in IIM perhaps secondary to better treatment and/or the diagnosis of mild disease. The discovery of anti-Jo-1 antibodies has renewed the investigation of a possible viral etiology of IIM. Studies of quantitative slot blot hybridization with coxsackievirus probes and RNA from IIM muscle biopsies and in situ hybridization of biopsies with a Theiler's virus probe have revealed a few positive hybridizations in each study. Although there are some fundamental problems with these studies, these intriguing results bear confirmation. These results continue to implicate picornaviruses as the primary suspects in the pathogenesis of IIM. HIV has now been associated with a number of rheumatologic syndromes, including a polymyositis that is indistinguishable from IIM, and we can expect additional changes in the epidemiology of this family of disorders in coming years. Study of these patients may provide insight into the etiopathogenesis of IIM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)655-665
Number of pages11
JournalRheumatic Disease Clinics of North America
Volume16
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Myositis
Theilovirus
Picornaviridae
RNA Probes
Biopsy
Polymyositis
Aptitude
Enterovirus
In Situ Hybridization
Epidemiology
HIV
Muscles
Mortality
Incidence
Population
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Cronin, M. E., & Plotz, P. H. (1990). Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. Rheumatic Disease Clinics of North America, 16(3), 655-665.

Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. / Cronin, M. E.; Plotz, P. H.

In: Rheumatic Disease Clinics of North America, Vol. 16, No. 3, 1990, p. 655-665.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cronin, ME & Plotz, PH 1990, 'Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies', Rheumatic Disease Clinics of North America, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 655-665.
Cronin, M. E. ; Plotz, P. H. / Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. In: Rheumatic Disease Clinics of North America. 1990 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 655-665.
@article{f59ee1f920ec48e68448d52e3acdcd1a,
title = "Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies",
abstract = "The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are a heterogeneous group of uncommon diseases. The incidence rate of IIM is approximately 5 cases per million population, but there appears to be an increase in the rate over the last two decades, particularly in black females. This may be a true increase or due to renewed interest and awareness of the disease and improvement in our ability to diagnose mild disease. There has also been progress in decreasing the mortality rate in IIM perhaps secondary to better treatment and/or the diagnosis of mild disease. The discovery of anti-Jo-1 antibodies has renewed the investigation of a possible viral etiology of IIM. Studies of quantitative slot blot hybridization with coxsackievirus probes and RNA from IIM muscle biopsies and in situ hybridization of biopsies with a Theiler's virus probe have revealed a few positive hybridizations in each study. Although there are some fundamental problems with these studies, these intriguing results bear confirmation. These results continue to implicate picornaviruses as the primary suspects in the pathogenesis of IIM. HIV has now been associated with a number of rheumatologic syndromes, including a polymyositis that is indistinguishable from IIM, and we can expect additional changes in the epidemiology of this family of disorders in coming years. Study of these patients may provide insight into the etiopathogenesis of IIM.",
author = "Cronin, {M. E.} and Plotz, {P. H.}",
year = "1990",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "655--665",
journal = "Rheumatic Disease Clinics of North America",
issn = "0889-857X",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

AU - Cronin, M. E.

AU - Plotz, P. H.

PY - 1990

Y1 - 1990

N2 - The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are a heterogeneous group of uncommon diseases. The incidence rate of IIM is approximately 5 cases per million population, but there appears to be an increase in the rate over the last two decades, particularly in black females. This may be a true increase or due to renewed interest and awareness of the disease and improvement in our ability to diagnose mild disease. There has also been progress in decreasing the mortality rate in IIM perhaps secondary to better treatment and/or the diagnosis of mild disease. The discovery of anti-Jo-1 antibodies has renewed the investigation of a possible viral etiology of IIM. Studies of quantitative slot blot hybridization with coxsackievirus probes and RNA from IIM muscle biopsies and in situ hybridization of biopsies with a Theiler's virus probe have revealed a few positive hybridizations in each study. Although there are some fundamental problems with these studies, these intriguing results bear confirmation. These results continue to implicate picornaviruses as the primary suspects in the pathogenesis of IIM. HIV has now been associated with a number of rheumatologic syndromes, including a polymyositis that is indistinguishable from IIM, and we can expect additional changes in the epidemiology of this family of disorders in coming years. Study of these patients may provide insight into the etiopathogenesis of IIM.

AB - The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are a heterogeneous group of uncommon diseases. The incidence rate of IIM is approximately 5 cases per million population, but there appears to be an increase in the rate over the last two decades, particularly in black females. This may be a true increase or due to renewed interest and awareness of the disease and improvement in our ability to diagnose mild disease. There has also been progress in decreasing the mortality rate in IIM perhaps secondary to better treatment and/or the diagnosis of mild disease. The discovery of anti-Jo-1 antibodies has renewed the investigation of a possible viral etiology of IIM. Studies of quantitative slot blot hybridization with coxsackievirus probes and RNA from IIM muscle biopsies and in situ hybridization of biopsies with a Theiler's virus probe have revealed a few positive hybridizations in each study. Although there are some fundamental problems with these studies, these intriguing results bear confirmation. These results continue to implicate picornaviruses as the primary suspects in the pathogenesis of IIM. HIV has now been associated with a number of rheumatologic syndromes, including a polymyositis that is indistinguishable from IIM, and we can expect additional changes in the epidemiology of this family of disorders in coming years. Study of these patients may provide insight into the etiopathogenesis of IIM.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025169220&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025169220&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 2217963

AN - SCOPUS:0025169220

VL - 16

SP - 655

EP - 665

JO - Rheumatic Disease Clinics of North America

JF - Rheumatic Disease Clinics of North America

SN - 0889-857X

IS - 3

ER -