Identifying supportive and unsupportive responses of others: Perspectives of African American and Caucasian cancer patients

Christina M. Grange, Robin K. Matsuyama, Kathleen M. Ingram, Laurie J. Lyckholm, Thomas J. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study uses focus group methodology to examine supportive and unsupportive responses experienced by African American and Caucasian cancer patients. Supportive responses included practical assistance, as well as people's willingness to listen, maintain a positive attitude, and pray. Unsupportive responses included others' withdrawal behaviors, patients having to support friends/family as they coped, and family/friends limiting patients' independence. Results reflect ways in which mental health providers, social workers, and health care providers can help patients express support needs, as well as how social networks can be better educated about the types of support valued by patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-99
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Psychosocial Oncology
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 4 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Ethnic differences
  • Supportive and unsupportive responses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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