Identification of urinary metabolites that correlate with clinical improvements in children with autism treated with sulforaphane from broccoli

Stephen Bent, Brittany Lawton, Tracy Warren, Felicia Widjaja, Katherine Dang, Jed W Fahey, Brian Cornblatt, Jason M. Kinchen, Kevin Delucchi, Robert L. Hendren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have urinary metabolites suggesting impairments in several pathways, including oxidative stress, inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, and gut microbiome alterations. Sulforaphane, a supplement with indirect antioxidant effects that are derived from broccoli sprouts and seeds, was recently shown to lead to improvements in behavior and social responsiveness in children with ASD. We conducted the current open-label study to determine if we could identify changes in urinary metabolites that were associated with clinical improvements with the goal of identifying a potential mechanism of action. Methods: Children and young adults enrolled in a school for children with ASD and related neurodevelopmental disorders were recruited to participate in a 12-week, open-label study of sulforaphane. Fasting urinary metabolites and measures of behavior (Aberrant Behavior Checklist - ABC) and social responsiveness (Social Responsiveness Scale - SRS) were measured at baseline and at the end of the study. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated for the pre- to post-intervention change in each of the two clinical scales (ABS and SRS) versus the change in each metabolite. Results: Fifteen children completed the 12-week study. Mean scores on both symptom measures showed improvements (decreases) over the study period, but only the change in the SRS was significant. The ABC improved - 7.1 points (95% CI - 17.4 to 3.2), and the SRS improved - 9.7 points (95% CI - 18.7 to - 0.8). We identified 77 urinary metabolites that were correlated with changes in symptoms, and they clustered into pathways of oxidative stress, amino acid/gut microbiome, neurotransmitters, hormones, and sphingomyelin metabolism. Conclusions: Urinary metabolomics analysis is a useful tool to identify pathways that may be involved in the mechanism of action of treatments targeting abnormal physiology in ASD. Trial registration: This study was prospectively registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02654743) on January 11, 2016.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number35
JournalMolecular Autism
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 30 2018

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Brassica
Autistic Disorder
Oxidative Stress
Metabolomics
Sphingomyelins
Checklist
Action Potentials
Neurotransmitter Agents
Young Adult
Fasting
Seeds
Antioxidants
sulforafan
Hormones
Inflammation
Amino Acids
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Gastrointestinal Microbiome

Keywords

  • Antioxidant
  • Autism
  • Biomarker
  • Metabolomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Developmental Biology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Identification of urinary metabolites that correlate with clinical improvements in children with autism treated with sulforaphane from broccoli. / Bent, Stephen; Lawton, Brittany; Warren, Tracy; Widjaja, Felicia; Dang, Katherine; Fahey, Jed W; Cornblatt, Brian; Kinchen, Jason M.; Delucchi, Kevin; Hendren, Robert L.

In: Molecular Autism, Vol. 9, No. 1, 35, 30.05.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bent, Stephen ; Lawton, Brittany ; Warren, Tracy ; Widjaja, Felicia ; Dang, Katherine ; Fahey, Jed W ; Cornblatt, Brian ; Kinchen, Jason M. ; Delucchi, Kevin ; Hendren, Robert L. / Identification of urinary metabolites that correlate with clinical improvements in children with autism treated with sulforaphane from broccoli. In: Molecular Autism. 2018 ; Vol. 9, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background: Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have urinary metabolites suggesting impairments in several pathways, including oxidative stress, inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, and gut microbiome alterations. Sulforaphane, a supplement with indirect antioxidant effects that are derived from broccoli sprouts and seeds, was recently shown to lead to improvements in behavior and social responsiveness in children with ASD. We conducted the current open-label study to determine if we could identify changes in urinary metabolites that were associated with clinical improvements with the goal of identifying a potential mechanism of action. Methods: Children and young adults enrolled in a school for children with ASD and related neurodevelopmental disorders were recruited to participate in a 12-week, open-label study of sulforaphane. Fasting urinary metabolites and measures of behavior (Aberrant Behavior Checklist - ABC) and social responsiveness (Social Responsiveness Scale - SRS) were measured at baseline and at the end of the study. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated for the pre- to post-intervention change in each of the two clinical scales (ABS and SRS) versus the change in each metabolite. Results: Fifteen children completed the 12-week study. Mean scores on both symptom measures showed improvements (decreases) over the study period, but only the change in the SRS was significant. The ABC improved - 7.1 points (95{\%} CI - 17.4 to 3.2), and the SRS improved - 9.7 points (95{\%} CI - 18.7 to - 0.8). We identified 77 urinary metabolites that were correlated with changes in symptoms, and they clustered into pathways of oxidative stress, amino acid/gut microbiome, neurotransmitters, hormones, and sphingomyelin metabolism. Conclusions: Urinary metabolomics analysis is a useful tool to identify pathways that may be involved in the mechanism of action of treatments targeting abnormal physiology in ASD. Trial registration: This study was prospectively registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02654743) on January 11, 2016.",
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AU - Bent, Stephen

AU - Lawton, Brittany

AU - Warren, Tracy

AU - Widjaja, Felicia

AU - Dang, Katherine

AU - Fahey, Jed W

AU - Cornblatt, Brian

AU - Kinchen, Jason M.

AU - Delucchi, Kevin

AU - Hendren, Robert L.

PY - 2018/5/30

Y1 - 2018/5/30

N2 - Background: Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have urinary metabolites suggesting impairments in several pathways, including oxidative stress, inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, and gut microbiome alterations. Sulforaphane, a supplement with indirect antioxidant effects that are derived from broccoli sprouts and seeds, was recently shown to lead to improvements in behavior and social responsiveness in children with ASD. We conducted the current open-label study to determine if we could identify changes in urinary metabolites that were associated with clinical improvements with the goal of identifying a potential mechanism of action. Methods: Children and young adults enrolled in a school for children with ASD and related neurodevelopmental disorders were recruited to participate in a 12-week, open-label study of sulforaphane. Fasting urinary metabolites and measures of behavior (Aberrant Behavior Checklist - ABC) and social responsiveness (Social Responsiveness Scale - SRS) were measured at baseline and at the end of the study. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated for the pre- to post-intervention change in each of the two clinical scales (ABS and SRS) versus the change in each metabolite. Results: Fifteen children completed the 12-week study. Mean scores on both symptom measures showed improvements (decreases) over the study period, but only the change in the SRS was significant. The ABC improved - 7.1 points (95% CI - 17.4 to 3.2), and the SRS improved - 9.7 points (95% CI - 18.7 to - 0.8). We identified 77 urinary metabolites that were correlated with changes in symptoms, and they clustered into pathways of oxidative stress, amino acid/gut microbiome, neurotransmitters, hormones, and sphingomyelin metabolism. Conclusions: Urinary metabolomics analysis is a useful tool to identify pathways that may be involved in the mechanism of action of treatments targeting abnormal physiology in ASD. Trial registration: This study was prospectively registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02654743) on January 11, 2016.

AB - Background: Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have urinary metabolites suggesting impairments in several pathways, including oxidative stress, inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, and gut microbiome alterations. Sulforaphane, a supplement with indirect antioxidant effects that are derived from broccoli sprouts and seeds, was recently shown to lead to improvements in behavior and social responsiveness in children with ASD. We conducted the current open-label study to determine if we could identify changes in urinary metabolites that were associated with clinical improvements with the goal of identifying a potential mechanism of action. Methods: Children and young adults enrolled in a school for children with ASD and related neurodevelopmental disorders were recruited to participate in a 12-week, open-label study of sulforaphane. Fasting urinary metabolites and measures of behavior (Aberrant Behavior Checklist - ABC) and social responsiveness (Social Responsiveness Scale - SRS) were measured at baseline and at the end of the study. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated for the pre- to post-intervention change in each of the two clinical scales (ABS and SRS) versus the change in each metabolite. Results: Fifteen children completed the 12-week study. Mean scores on both symptom measures showed improvements (decreases) over the study period, but only the change in the SRS was significant. The ABC improved - 7.1 points (95% CI - 17.4 to 3.2), and the SRS improved - 9.7 points (95% CI - 18.7 to - 0.8). We identified 77 urinary metabolites that were correlated with changes in symptoms, and they clustered into pathways of oxidative stress, amino acid/gut microbiome, neurotransmitters, hormones, and sphingomyelin metabolism. Conclusions: Urinary metabolomics analysis is a useful tool to identify pathways that may be involved in the mechanism of action of treatments targeting abnormal physiology in ASD. Trial registration: This study was prospectively registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02654743) on January 11, 2016.

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