Identification of potential vectors of and detection of antibodies against Rift Valley fever virus in livestock during interepizootic periods

Melinda K. Rostal, Alina L. Evans, Rosemary Sang, Solomon Gikundi, Lilian Wakhule, Peninah Munyua, Joseph Macharia, Daniel R. Feikin, Robert F. Breiman, M. Kariuki Njenga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective - To evaluate the prevalence of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) antibodies in livestock and presence of competent mosquito vectors of RVFV during an interepizootic period (IEP) in Kenya. Animals - 208 sheep and 84 goats ranging in age from 4 months to 15 years, from 2 breeding herds. Procedures - Blood specimens were collected from the sheep and goats during the 1999-2006 IEP in Rift Valley Province, and serum was harvested. Serum specimens were tested for IgG and IgM antibodies against RVFV by use of an ELISA. In addition, 7,134 mosquitoes were trapped in Naivasha, Nairobi, and Northeastern Province, and speciation was performed. Results - No animals were seropositive for IgM against RVFV. Of the animals born after the 1997-1998 epizootic, 18% (34/188) of sheep were seropositive for IgG against RVFV, compared with 3% (2/75) of goats. Seventy percent (8,144/11,678) of the mosquitoes collected were of the Culex subgenera; 18% (2,102/11,678) were Aedes spp. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Detection of IgG in the sera of sheep and goats born after the 1997-1998 epizootic and before the 2006 epizootic indicated that virus activity existed during the IER Detection of Aedes mosquitoes, which are competent vectors of RVFV, suggested that a cryptic vector-to-vertebrate cycle may exist during IEPs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)522-526
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican journal of veterinary research
Volume71
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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