Identification and characterization of microsatellite markers in the Chagas disease vector Triatoma dimidiata

Jennifer M. Anderson, James E. Lai, Ellen M. Dotson, Celia Cordon-Rosales, Carlos Ponce, Douglas E. Norris, C. Ben Beard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Triatoma dimidiata, one of the major vectors of Chagas disease in Central America, is found in both domestic and peri-domestic habitats. Questions concerning population boundaries, infestation rates, insecticide resistance, and geographic dispersal of triatomine bugs persist and may be resolved using genetic markers such as microsatellites. Microsatellites are short tandem repeats found dispersed throughout a genome and can be useful for genotypic identification. We developed a plasmid library from the genomic DNA isolated from a single T. dimidiata adult collected in Guatamala. Ten thousand clones were screened using a probe consisting of nine microsatellite oligonucleotides. Eight loci appear polymorphic among populations found in Guatemala, Honduras, and Mexico, and thus are potentially useful for population genetic applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)243-248
Number of pages6
JournalInfection, Genetics and Evolution
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Keywords

  • Chagas disease
  • Microsatellites
  • Triatoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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