Ideal cardiovascular health and resting heart rate in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

Olatokunbo Osibogun, Oluseye Ogunmoroti, Erica S. Spatz, Oluwaseun E. Fashanu, Erin D. Michos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is associated with an increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, but little is known about its association with cardiovascular health (CVH), assessed by the Life's Simple 7 (LS7) metrics. We explored whether ideal CVH was associated with RHR in a cohort free from clinical CVD. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data (2000−2002) of 6457 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis participants in 2018. Each LS7 metric (smoking, physical activity, diet, body mass index, blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose) was scored 0–2. Total score ranged from 0 to 14. Scores of 0–8 indicate inadequate, 9–10 average, and 11–14 optimal CVH. RHR was categorized as <60, 60–69, 70–79 and ≥80 bpm. We used multinomial logistic regression to determine associations between CVH score and RHR, adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, income, health insurance, and atrioventricular nodal blockers. Mean age of participants (standard deviation) was 62 (10) years; 53% were women; 47% had inadequate CVH, 33% average, and 20% optimal. Favorable CVH was associated with lower odds of having higher RHR. Compared to RHR <60 bpm, participants with optimal CVH had adjusted odds ratio (95% CI) of 0.55 (0.46–0.64) for RHR of 60-69 bpm, 0.34 (0.28–0.43) for 70–79 bpm, and 0.14 (0.09–0.22) for ≥80 bpm. A similar pattern was observed in the stratified analysis by sex, race/ethnicity and age. Favorable CVH was less likely to be associated with elevated RHR irrespective of sex, race/ethnicity and age. More research is needed to explore the usefulness of promoting ideal CVH to reduce elevated RHR, a known risk factor for CVD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number105890
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume130
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2020

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Atherosclerosis
Heart Rate
Health
Cardiovascular Diseases
Health Insurance
Blood Glucose
Body Mass Index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Smoking
Odds Ratio
Cholesterol
Exercise
Diet
Blood Pressure
Education
Research

Keywords

  • Ideal cardiovascular health metrics
  • Life's simple 7
  • Prevention
  • Resting heart rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Ideal cardiovascular health and resting heart rate in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. / Osibogun, Olatokunbo; Ogunmoroti, Oluseye; Spatz, Erica S.; Fashanu, Oluwaseun E.; Michos, Erin D.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 130, 105890, 01.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Osibogun, Olatokunbo ; Ogunmoroti, Oluseye ; Spatz, Erica S. ; Fashanu, Oluwaseun E. ; Michos, Erin D. / Ideal cardiovascular health and resting heart rate in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. In: Preventive Medicine. 2020 ; Vol. 130.
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abstract = "Elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is associated with an increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, but little is known about its association with cardiovascular health (CVH), assessed by the Life's Simple 7 (LS7) metrics. We explored whether ideal CVH was associated with RHR in a cohort free from clinical CVD. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data (2000−2002) of 6457 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis participants in 2018. Each LS7 metric (smoking, physical activity, diet, body mass index, blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose) was scored 0–2. Total score ranged from 0 to 14. Scores of 0–8 indicate inadequate, 9–10 average, and 11–14 optimal CVH. RHR was categorized as <60, 60–69, 70–79 and ≥80 bpm. We used multinomial logistic regression to determine associations between CVH score and RHR, adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, income, health insurance, and atrioventricular nodal blockers. Mean age of participants (standard deviation) was 62 (10) years; 53{\%} were women; 47{\%} had inadequate CVH, 33{\%} average, and 20{\%} optimal. Favorable CVH was associated with lower odds of having higher RHR. Compared to RHR <60 bpm, participants with optimal CVH had adjusted odds ratio (95{\%} CI) of 0.55 (0.46–0.64) for RHR of 60-69 bpm, 0.34 (0.28–0.43) for 70–79 bpm, and 0.14 (0.09–0.22) for ≥80 bpm. A similar pattern was observed in the stratified analysis by sex, race/ethnicity and age. Favorable CVH was less likely to be associated with elevated RHR irrespective of sex, race/ethnicity and age. More research is needed to explore the usefulness of promoting ideal CVH to reduce elevated RHR, a known risk factor for CVD.",
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