Hypoxia-inducible factors promote breast cancer stem cell specification and maintenance in response to hypoxia or cytotoxic chemotherapy

Lisha Xiang, Gregg L Semenza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Clinical studies have revealed that breast cancers contain regions of intratumoral hypoxia (reduced oxygen availability), which activates hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). The relationship between intratumoral hypoxia, distant metastasis and cancer mortality has been well established. A major mechanism by which intratumoral hypoxia contributes to disease progression is through induction of the breast cancer stem cell (BCSC) phenotype. BCSCs are a small subpopulation of cells with the capability for self-renewal. BCSCs have been implicated in resistance to chemotherapy, disease recurrence, and metastasis. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying HIF-dependent induction of the BCSC phenotype in response to hypoxia or chemotherapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAdvances in Cancer Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Chemotherapy
  • Intratumoral hypoxia
  • Metabolism
  • Metastasis
  • Nanog
  • Pluripotency factor
  • Relapse
  • Self-renewal
  • Stem cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Hypoxia-inducible factors promote breast cancer stem cell specification and maintenance in response to hypoxia or cytotoxic chemotherapy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this