Hypoxia-inducible factors: Coupling glucose metabolism and redox regulation with induction of the breast cancer stem cell phenotype

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Reduced oxygen availability (hypoxia) leads to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the electron transport chain. Here, I review recent work delineating mechanisms by which hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) mediates adaptive metabolic responses to hypoxia, including increased flux through the glycolytic pathway and decreased flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle, in order to decrease mitochondrial ROS production. HIF-1 also mediates increased flux through the serine synthesis pathway and mitochondrial one-carbon (folate cycle) metabolism to increase mitochondrial antioxidant production (NADPH and glutathione). Dynamic maintenance of ROS homeostasis is required for induction of the breast cancer stem cell phenotype in response to hypoxia or cytotoxic chemotherapy. Consistently, inhibition of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, the first enzyme of the serine synthesis pathway, in breast cancer cells impairs tumor initiation, metastasis, and response to cytotoxic chemotherapy. I discuss how these findings have important implications for understanding the logic of the tumor microenvironment and for improving therapeutic responses in women with breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEMBO Journal
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016

Fingerprint

Neoplastic Stem Cells
Stem cells
Metabolism
Oxidation-Reduction
Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1
Reactive Oxygen Species
Chemotherapy
Breast Neoplasms
Fluxes
Phenotype
Glucose
Serine
Tumors
Phosphoglycerate Dehydrogenase
Carbon Cycle
Drug Therapy
Tumor Microenvironment
Citric Acid Cycle
Electron Transport
NADP

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • One-carbon metabolism
  • Pluripotency
  • Progression
  • Serine synthesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

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title = "Hypoxia-inducible factors: Coupling glucose metabolism and redox regulation with induction of the breast cancer stem cell phenotype",
abstract = "Reduced oxygen availability (hypoxia) leads to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the electron transport chain. Here, I review recent work delineating mechanisms by which hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) mediates adaptive metabolic responses to hypoxia, including increased flux through the glycolytic pathway and decreased flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle, in order to decrease mitochondrial ROS production. HIF-1 also mediates increased flux through the serine synthesis pathway and mitochondrial one-carbon (folate cycle) metabolism to increase mitochondrial antioxidant production (NADPH and glutathione). Dynamic maintenance of ROS homeostasis is required for induction of the breast cancer stem cell phenotype in response to hypoxia or cytotoxic chemotherapy. Consistently, inhibition of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, the first enzyme of the serine synthesis pathway, in breast cancer cells impairs tumor initiation, metastasis, and response to cytotoxic chemotherapy. I discuss how these findings have important implications for understanding the logic of the tumor microenvironment and for improving therapeutic responses in women with breast cancer.",
keywords = "Cancer, One-carbon metabolism, Pluripotency, Progression, Serine synthesis",
author = "Semenza, {Gregg L}",
year = "2016",
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AB - Reduced oxygen availability (hypoxia) leads to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the electron transport chain. Here, I review recent work delineating mechanisms by which hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) mediates adaptive metabolic responses to hypoxia, including increased flux through the glycolytic pathway and decreased flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle, in order to decrease mitochondrial ROS production. HIF-1 also mediates increased flux through the serine synthesis pathway and mitochondrial one-carbon (folate cycle) metabolism to increase mitochondrial antioxidant production (NADPH and glutathione). Dynamic maintenance of ROS homeostasis is required for induction of the breast cancer stem cell phenotype in response to hypoxia or cytotoxic chemotherapy. Consistently, inhibition of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, the first enzyme of the serine synthesis pathway, in breast cancer cells impairs tumor initiation, metastasis, and response to cytotoxic chemotherapy. I discuss how these findings have important implications for understanding the logic of the tumor microenvironment and for improving therapeutic responses in women with breast cancer.

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KW - One-carbon metabolism

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KW - Progression

KW - Serine synthesis

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