Hypothesis: Impregnated school uniforms reduce the incidence of dengue infections in school children

A. Wilder-Smith, A. Lover, P. Kittayapong, G. Burnham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Dengue infection causes a significant economic, social and medical burden in affected populations in over 100 countries in the tropics and sub-tropics. Current dengue control efforts have generally focused on vector control but have not shown major impact. School-aged children are especially vulnerable to infection, due to sustained human-vector-human transmission in the close proximity environments of schools. Infection in children has a higher rate of complications, including dengue hemorrhagic fever and shock syndromes, than infections in adults. There is an urgent need for integrated and complementary population-based strategies to protect vulnerable children. We hypothesize that insecticide-treated school uniforms will reduce the incidence of dengue in school-aged children. The hypothesis would need to be tested in a community based randomized trial. If proven to be true, insecticide-treated school uniforms would be a cost-effective and scalable community based strategy to reduce the burden of dengue in children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)861-862
Number of pages2
JournalMedical Hypotheses
Volume76
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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