Hyporetinolemia and acute phase proteins in children with and without xerophthalmia

Richard D. Semba, Muhilal, Keith P. West, Gantira Natadisastra, Ward Eisinger, Yin Lan, Alfred Sommer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The relations among hyporetinolemia, acute phase proteins, and vitamin A status in children are unclear. Objective: The objective was to examine the relations between acute phase proteins and plasma retinol concentrations in children with and without clinical vitamin A deficiency (Bitot spots and night blindness). Design: The study was a nonconcurrent analysis of acute phase protein concentrations and other data from a previous clinical trial. Preschool children, 3-6 y of age, with (n = 118) and without (n = 118) xerophthalmia were assigned to receive oral vitamin A (60 mg retinol equivalent) or placebo and were seen at 5 wk. All children received oral vitamin A (60 mg retinol equivalent) at 5 wk. Results: At baseline, α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) was elevated in 42.9% and 23.5% (P < 0.003) and C-reactive protein (CRP) was elevated in 17.7% and 13.7% (NS) of children with and without xerophthalmia, respectively. Hyporetinolemia (retinol < 0.7 μmol/L) occurred in 61.0% and 47.4% (P < 0.04) of children with and without xerophthalmia, respectively. A history of fever, a history of cough, and nasal discharge noted on examination were each associated with elevated acute phase proteins. Vitamin A supplementation increased plasma retinol at 5 wk but had no significant effect on concentrations of acute phase proteins. Conclusions: Elevated acute phase protein concentrations and infectious disease morbidity are closely associated during vitamin A deficiency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)146-153
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume72
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2000

Keywords

  • Acute phase proteins
  • C-reactive protein
  • Indonesia
  • Infection
  • Morbidity
  • Preschool children
  • Retinol
  • Vitamin A
  • Xerophthalmia
  • α-acid glycoprotein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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