Hypoglycemia at admission is associated with inhospital mortality in Ugandan patients with severe sepsis

Richard Ssekitoleko, Shevin T. Jacob, Patrick Banura, Relana Pinkerton, David B. Meya, Steven James Reynolds, Nathan Kenya-Mugisha, Harriet Mayanja-Kizza, Rose Muhindo, Sanjay Bhagani, W. Michael Scheld, Christopher C. Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Dysglycemia during sepsis is associated with poor outcomes in resource-rich settings. In resource-limited settings, hypoglycemia is often diagnosed clinically without the benefit of laboratory support. We studied the utility of point-of-care glucose monitoring to predict mortality in severely septic patients in Uganda. Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: One national and two regional referral hospitals in Uganda. Patients: We enrolled 532 patients with sepsis at three hospitals in Uganda. The analysis included 418 patients from the three sites with inhospital mortality data, a documented admission blood glucose concentration, and evidence of organ dysfunction at admission (systolic blood pressure ≤100 mm Hg, lactate >4 mmol/L, platelet number

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2271-2276
Number of pages6
JournalCritical Care Medicine
Volume39
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011

Fingerprint

Hospital Mortality
Hypoglycemia
Uganda
Sepsis
Point-of-Care Systems
Blood Pressure
Platelet Count
Observational Studies
Blood Glucose
Lactic Acid
Referral and Consultation
Prospective Studies
Glucose
Mortality

Keywords

  • Africa
  • hypoglycemia
  • mortality
  • outcomes
  • severe sepsis
  • Uganda

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Hypoglycemia at admission is associated with inhospital mortality in Ugandan patients with severe sepsis. / Ssekitoleko, Richard; Jacob, Shevin T.; Banura, Patrick; Pinkerton, Relana; Meya, David B.; Reynolds, Steven James; Kenya-Mugisha, Nathan; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Muhindo, Rose; Bhagani, Sanjay; Scheld, W. Michael; Moore, Christopher C.

In: Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 39, No. 10, 10.2011, p. 2271-2276.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ssekitoleko, R, Jacob, ST, Banura, P, Pinkerton, R, Meya, DB, Reynolds, SJ, Kenya-Mugisha, N, Mayanja-Kizza, H, Muhindo, R, Bhagani, S, Scheld, WM & Moore, CC 2011, 'Hypoglycemia at admission is associated with inhospital mortality in Ugandan patients with severe sepsis', Critical Care Medicine, vol. 39, no. 10, pp. 2271-2276. https://doi.org/10.1097/CCM.0b013e3182227bd2
Ssekitoleko, Richard ; Jacob, Shevin T. ; Banura, Patrick ; Pinkerton, Relana ; Meya, David B. ; Reynolds, Steven James ; Kenya-Mugisha, Nathan ; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet ; Muhindo, Rose ; Bhagani, Sanjay ; Scheld, W. Michael ; Moore, Christopher C. / Hypoglycemia at admission is associated with inhospital mortality in Ugandan patients with severe sepsis. In: Critical Care Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 39, No. 10. pp. 2271-2276.
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