Hypertension, overweight/obesity, and diabetes among immigrants in the United States: An analysis of the 2010-2016 National Health Interview Survey

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Abstract

Background: Ethnic minority populations in the United States (US) are disproportionately affected by cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, including hypertension, overweight/obesity, and diabetes. The size and diversity of ethnic minority immigrant populations in the US have increased substantially over the past three decades. However, most studies on immigrants in the US are limited to Asians and Hispanics; only a few have examined the prevalence of CVD risk factors across diverse immigrant populations. The prevalence of diagnosed hypertension, overweight/obesity, and diagnosed diabetes was examined and contrasted among a socioeconomically diverse sample of immigrants. It was hypothesized that considerable variability would exist in the prevalence of hypertension, overweight and diabetes. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of the 2010-2016 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) was conducted among 41,717 immigrants born in Europe, South America, Mexico/Central America/Caribbean, Russia, Africa, Middle East, Indian subcontinent, Asia and Southeast Asia. The outcomes were the prevalence of diagnosed hypertension, overweight/obesity, and diagnosed diabetes. Results: The highest multivariable adjusted prevalence of diagnosed hypertension was observed in Russian (24.2%) and Southeast Asian immigrants (23.5%). Immigrants from Mexico/Central America/Caribbean and the Indian subcontinent had the highest prevalence of overweight/obesity (71.5 and 73.4%, respectively) and diagnosed diabetes (9.6 and 10.1%, respectively). Compared to European immigrants, immigrants from Mexico/Central America/Caribbean and the Indian subcontinent respectively had higher prevalence of overweight/obesity (Prevalence Ratio (PR): 1.19[95% CI, 1.13-1.24]) and (PR: 1.22[95% CI, 1.14-1.29]), and diabetes (PR: 1.70[95% CI, 1.42-2.03]) and (PR: 1.78[95% CI, 1.36-2.32]). African immigrants and Middle Eastern immigrants had a higher prevalence of diabetes (PR: 1.41[95% CI, 1.01-1.96]) and PR: 1.57(95% CI: 1.09-2.25), respectively, than European immigrants - without a corresponding higher prevalence of overweight/obesity. Conclusions: Immigrants from Mexico/Central America/Caribbean and the Indian subcontinent bore the highest burden of overweight/obesity and diabetes while those from Southeast Asia and Russia bore the highest burden of hypertension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number773
JournalBMC public health
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 20 2018

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Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Ethnic minorities
  • Hypertension
  • Immigrants
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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