Hypertension and the Risk of Incident Gout in a Population-Based Study: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Cohort

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Abstract

The authors quantified the impact of hypertension on gout incidence in middle-aged white and African American men and women. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC) was a prospective population-based cohort that recruited patients between 1987 and 1989 from 4 US communities. Using a time-dependent Cox proportional hazards model, the authors estimated the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of incident gout by time-varying hypertension and tested for mediation by serum urate level. There were 10,872 participants among whom 45% had hypertension during follow-up; 43% were men and 21% were African American. Over 9years, 274 (2.5%) participants developed gout (1.8% of women and 3.5% of men). The unadjusted HR of incident gout was approximately 3 times (HR, 2.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.24-3.78) greater for those with hypertension. Adjusting for confounders resulted in an attenuated but still significant association between hypertension and gout (HR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.54-2.61). Adjustment for serum urate level further attenuated but did not abrogate the association (HR, 1.36, 95% CI, 1.04-1.79). There was no evidence of effect modification by sex (P=35), race (P=99), or obesity at baseline (P=82). Hypertension was independently associated with increased gout risk in middle-aged African American and white adults. Serum urate level may be a partial intermediate on the pathway between hypertension and gout.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)675-679
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Hypertension
Volume14
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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