Hypermethylation of ASC/TMS1 Is a sputum marker for late-stage lung cancer

Emi Ota Machida, Malcolm V Brock, Craig M. Hooker, Jun Nakayama, Akiko Ishida, Jun Amano, Maria A. Picchi, Steven A. Belinsky, Jarnes G. Herman, Shun'ichiro Taniguchi, Stephen B Baylin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

DNA hypermethylated gene promoter sequences are extremely promising cancer markers. Their use for risk assessment, early diagnosis, or prognosis depends on the timing of this gene change during tumor progression. We studied this for the proapoptotic gene ASC/TMS1 in lung cancer and used the findings to develop a sputum marker. ASC/TMS1 protein levels are reduced in all lung cancer types (30 of 40; 75%) but not in 10 preinvasive lesions. Hypermethylation of ASC/TMS1 is also associated with invasive cancers (41 of 152 or 27.0% of all lung cancer types) with variation in incidence between histopathologic types including 32.1% (26 of 81) of adenocarcinomas, 13.2% (7 of 53) of squamous cell carcinomas, 38.5% (5 of 13) of large-cell carcinomas, and 60% (3 of 5) of small-cell lung cancers. The hypermethylation is particularly correlated with late tumor stages being present in only 14% of stage I but 60% of later-stage tumors. The incidence of ASC/TMS1 hypermethylation in sputum DNA fully mimics the tissue findings being present in only 2% (2 of 85) of high-risk, cancer-free smokers, 15% (3 of 18) of patients with stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but 41% of patients with stage III NSCLC (18 of 44), including 56% (10 of 18) of those with adenocarcinoma. Importantly, sputum is positive for this marker in 24% (10 of 42) of very high risk, clinically cancer-free individuals previously resected for stage I NSCLC. Thus, hypermethylation of ASC/TMS1 is a marker for late-stage lung cancer and, in sputum, could predict prognosis in patients resected for early-stage disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6210-6218
Number of pages9
JournalCancer Research
Volume66
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2006

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Sputum
Lung Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Adenocarcinoma
Genes
Large Cell Carcinoma
DNA
Incidence
Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Early Diagnosis
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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Hypermethylation of ASC/TMS1 Is a sputum marker for late-stage lung cancer. / Machida, Emi Ota; Brock, Malcolm V; Hooker, Craig M.; Nakayama, Jun; Ishida, Akiko; Amano, Jun; Picchi, Maria A.; Belinsky, Steven A.; Herman, Jarnes G.; Taniguchi, Shun'ichiro; Baylin, Stephen B.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 66, No. 12, 15.06.2006, p. 6210-6218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Machida, EO, Brock, MV, Hooker, CM, Nakayama, J, Ishida, A, Amano, J, Picchi, MA, Belinsky, SA, Herman, JG, Taniguchi, S & Baylin, SB 2006, 'Hypermethylation of ASC/TMS1 Is a sputum marker for late-stage lung cancer', Cancer Research, vol. 66, no. 12, pp. 6210-6218. https://doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-05-4447
Machida, Emi Ota ; Brock, Malcolm V ; Hooker, Craig M. ; Nakayama, Jun ; Ishida, Akiko ; Amano, Jun ; Picchi, Maria A. ; Belinsky, Steven A. ; Herman, Jarnes G. ; Taniguchi, Shun'ichiro ; Baylin, Stephen B. / Hypermethylation of ASC/TMS1 Is a sputum marker for late-stage lung cancer. In: Cancer Research. 2006 ; Vol. 66, No. 12. pp. 6210-6218.
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abstract = "DNA hypermethylated gene promoter sequences are extremely promising cancer markers. Their use for risk assessment, early diagnosis, or prognosis depends on the timing of this gene change during tumor progression. We studied this for the proapoptotic gene ASC/TMS1 in lung cancer and used the findings to develop a sputum marker. ASC/TMS1 protein levels are reduced in all lung cancer types (30 of 40; 75{\%}) but not in 10 preinvasive lesions. Hypermethylation of ASC/TMS1 is also associated with invasive cancers (41 of 152 or 27.0{\%} of all lung cancer types) with variation in incidence between histopathologic types including 32.1{\%} (26 of 81) of adenocarcinomas, 13.2{\%} (7 of 53) of squamous cell carcinomas, 38.5{\%} (5 of 13) of large-cell carcinomas, and 60{\%} (3 of 5) of small-cell lung cancers. The hypermethylation is particularly correlated with late tumor stages being present in only 14{\%} of stage I but 60{\%} of later-stage tumors. The incidence of ASC/TMS1 hypermethylation in sputum DNA fully mimics the tissue findings being present in only 2{\%} (2 of 85) of high-risk, cancer-free smokers, 15{\%} (3 of 18) of patients with stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but 41{\%} of patients with stage III NSCLC (18 of 44), including 56{\%} (10 of 18) of those with adenocarcinoma. Importantly, sputum is positive for this marker in 24{\%} (10 of 42) of very high risk, clinically cancer-free individuals previously resected for stage I NSCLC. Thus, hypermethylation of ASC/TMS1 is a marker for late-stage lung cancer and, in sputum, could predict prognosis in patients resected for early-stage disease.",
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AU - Hooker, Craig M.

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AU - Ishida, Akiko

AU - Amano, Jun

AU - Picchi, Maria A.

AU - Belinsky, Steven A.

AU - Herman, Jarnes G.

AU - Taniguchi, Shun'ichiro

AU - Baylin, Stephen B

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