Hydrocarbon Release During Fuel Storage and Transfer at Gas Stations: Environmental and Health Effects

Markus Hilpert, Bernat A.dria Mora, Jian Ni, Ana M. Rule, Keeve E. Nachman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

At gas stations, fuel is stored and transferred between tanker trucks, storage tanks, and vehicle tanks. During both storage and transfer, a small fraction of unburned fuel is typically released to the environment unless pollution prevention technology is used. While the fraction may be small, the cumulative release can be substantial because of the large quantities of fuel sold. The cumulative release of unburned fuel is a public health concern because gas stations are widely distributed in residential areas and because fuel contains toxic and carcinogenic chemicals. We review the pathways through which gasoline is chronically released to atmospheric, aqueous, and subsurface environments, and how these releases may adversely affect human health. Adoption of suitable pollution prevention technology should not only be based on equipment and maintenance cost but also on energy- and health care-saving benefits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)412-422
Number of pages11
JournalCurrent environmental health reports
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

Keywords

  • Adverse health effects
  • Fuel spills
  • Gas stations
  • Pollution prevention
  • Vapor emissions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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