Humor styles impact the relationship between symptoms of social anxiety and depression

Raymond P. Tucker, Matt R. Judah, Victoria M. O'Keefe, Adam C. Mills, William V. Lechner, Collin L. Davidson, De Mond M. Grant, La Ricka R. Wingate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent research suggests that examining humor styles may contribute to our understanding of clinical problems, such as risk and resiliency. The goal of the current study was to examine whether humor styles moderate the association between social anxiety and depressive symptoms in an unselected sample. Three-hundred and six participants (66% female) at a large Southern US university completed self-report measures of humor styles and symptoms of social anxiety and depression. Regression analyses suggested that affiliative and self-defeating humor styles individually moderated the relationship between social anxiety and depressive symptoms. Clinical implications regarding the monitoring of humor use as a means of understanding the maintenance of depressive symptoms among socially anxious individuals are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)823-827
Number of pages5
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume55
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Dysphoria
  • Humor
  • Humor styles
  • Social anxiety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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  • Cite this

    Tucker, R. P., Judah, M. R., O'Keefe, V. M., Mills, A. C., Lechner, W. V., Davidson, C. L., Grant, D. M. M., & Wingate, L. R. R. (2013). Humor styles impact the relationship between symptoms of social anxiety and depression. Personality and Individual Differences, 55(7), 823-827. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2013.07.008